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Top 7 Best Tent Cot Reviews (Sleep Comfortable in 2018!)

When camping, nothing beats the experience of falling asleep to the sounds of nature around you. The gear you take with you determines your ability to sleep soundly. A sleeping bag has quickly become outdated as the preferred outdoor sleeping solution. Not even a regular camping cot can get the job done, which brings in the highly reliable tent cot.

It functions as a dual tent and cot wrapped up as one item. The best tent cot come with the option to sleep elevated from the ground. There are selections of them on the market, but our list of tent cot reviews focusses on the ones that give you the best bang for your buck with the highest ratings.

Best Cot For Tent Camping Comparison

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6 Best Camping Toilet Reviews (Portable & Easy!)

There is one thing that always irritates when camping – making the inevitable trips to the toilet. It always seems like all campsites set up the bathrooms at the extreme ends of their grounds. When nature calls, you have no choice but to stumble your way around the dark trying to navigate through tents or RVs to make it to the facilities. Worse yet is camping in the great outdoors where there are no facilities available.

The obvious solution is to go for portable toilets which are designed for use virtually anywhere. We searched and came up with a list of the best camping toilet reviews.

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Best Portable Toilets For Camping Comparison 

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5 Best Tent Heaters Reviewed (Stay Warm & Cozy!)

Camping, hiking, backpacking, and hunting are all recreational activities which have one thing in common; tents. One of the thrills of taking those outdoor trips is getting ready to settle in for the night (even when its cold). Which is why we decided to write a review of the best tent heaters on the market today.

Best Tent Heaters Comparison

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Complete Guide to Yosemite

The first effort to protect the area that is now Yosemite National Park was actually done by President Abraham Lincoln (a pretty influential person in American history) who signed a bill to protect parts of Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa grove of Sequoia trees.

John Muir, one of the best known American environmentalists, loved exploring the vast wilderness areas of northern California. The destruction of subalpine meadows around Yosemite Valley lead Muir into a prolonged struggle to protect the area which eventually lead to Yosemite becoming the nation´s second National Park (after Yellowstone) in 1890.

Even though the park was protected by the national government, the city of San Francisco, California had long been planning to dam the Tuolomne River as a source of drinking water and hydroelectric power for the city. Despite another long, political struggle (with Muir again at the forefront), the river was eventually damned. There are still efforts underway today to recover the natural state of the Tuolomne River which runs through the Hetch Hetchy Valley.

How Complete Is This Guide?

When it comes to any large place, it's hard to say the guide is "complete" - many of the places we write about can have a book (or even books) written about them. 

We do our best to visit, write, research, about all the places on this site. But alas, there are only so many hours in one day.

That said, if you want to contribute, or feel something somethign is incorrect, feel free to contact us to help make this guide a better places on the interwebs.

Among other attractions, Yosemite has 1600 miles of streams, 350 miles of roads, and 800 miles of hiking trails

Geology, Biodiversity, and Landscape

Yosemite National Park is a land of extremely diverse topography and landscapes. The Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project (https://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-43/) was fundamental in mapping out the entire Sierra Nevada ecosystem where Yosemite is located and offers us an abundance of information regarding the natural wonders of Yosemite.

One of the best known features of Yosemite are the massive granite cliffs that rise throughout the park. “El Capitan” and Half Dome are two of the most easily recognizable (and most sought out by mountain climbers).

These granite cliffs began forming around ten million years ago when geological forces caused the Sierra Nevada to lift up and tilt to its side. This caused steep eastern slopes where much of Yosemite is located.

During one Ice Age, around one million years ago, glaciers dominated the high alpine meadows in the region. Scientists imagine that the ice around what is today Yosemite National Park might have been upwards of 4,000 feet thick, more than ¾ a mile thick. When that mass of ice began to slide downwards off the mountain, it carved out the U-shaped valley which is today called Yosemite Valley, the most famous part of the park.

Yosemite also has over 300 species of vertebrate animals in the park. Black bears, mule deer, bighorn sheep, and the grey wolf are some of the most sought after animals by tourists, though catching a glimpse of the grey wolf takes a considerable amount of patience and good luck.

Yosemite also has three separated and isolated groves of Sequoia Forest, which are home to some of the largest trees in the world. Outside the sequoia groves, the majority of the vegetation is made up of coniferous forest. Over 225,000 acres of old growth forest still remain standing and intact in Yosemite National Park, one of the few areas in the continental United States where old growth forest remains.

When to Visit Yosemite

If you don’t mind the crowds of picture taking tourists, visiting Yosemite Valley in the peak summer months is the way to go. You won’t get any sort of solitude and seclusion, but it can be fun to share the beauty of the valley with others. If, however, you want a more unique Yosemite experience, you will want to consider alternative times to visit the park.

How to Avoid the Crowds

To avoid the crowds in Yosemite Valley, you will have to avoid the summer peak period of June to August all together. However, if you want to explore the other 99% of the park outside the Valley, you can pretty much go any time during the year.

Spring time is by far one of the best times to visit the park. School hasn’t let out for the summer meaning that you’ll miss most of the family vacations. Furthermore, the relatively chilly nights will keep other tourists away.

The snowmelt is at its peak meaning that the waterfalls will be gushing and if you time your trip right, you will also be greeted by a mosaic of wildflowers throughout the park.

Yosemite with the Family

When most people think of Yosemite National Park, the first thing that comes to mind is the image of adrenaline seeking mountain climbers hanging off of the sheer granite face of Half Dome. While they certainly are fun to watch, that´s not exactly a family friendly activity. Taking on a 4,000 foot incline to make it to the top of Yosemite Falls with two toddlers also makes for quite a strenuous hike that isn´t exactly made for families.

If you have small children or a large family, there´s no reason to put off a vacation to Yosemite until the kids are grown and off to college. There are dozens of family friendly activities all throughout the park. From panning for gold in a pristine mountain river to enjoying easy nature hikes, we´ve got all the information you need to plan a quality family vacation to one of America´s most iconic national parks.

Visit the Giant Sequoias

What could be more unique than taking your tiny children to stare up into the canopy of the massive sequoias. One of the pleasures of being a parent is watching your children explore the natural world and express their awe and wonder and what they see around them.

Children love to explore the relatively easy trails throughout the two different groves of Sequoias in Yosemite National Park, and are encouraged to touch and explore the gigantic trees. At the very least, it will make for a great photo opportunity.

Panning for Gold in the Merced River

The Merced River is a great river for family fun. Unlike other mountain rivers with their quick currents and rapids, the Merced flows peacefully throughout Yosemite Valley. The relatively shallow areas with large sandy beaches make it a great place for a family picnic, some fun mini-tubing practice, and a chance to cool off from the warm summer temperatures.

You can also give your kids a history lesson on the California Gold Rush, as bits of gold can still be found in the Merced River. Read up on how to pan for gold, bring along some basic equipment, and see if your children can find some gold specks in the river sand.

Junior Ranger Program

An essential part of visiting the beautiful areas of our nation´s national parks is also teaching our children about the importance of protecting these pristine areas. Yosemite has a fantastic Junior Ranger program that is both educational and participative. Your kids will have to fill out a workbook on the park, learn about some of the park´s wildlife, and do a “service project” to help keep the park clean in order to earn their badge.

Drive up to Glacier Point

Just because your kids aren´t able or willing to endure a grueling 10 mile hike up to the top of Half Dome doesn´t mean that you can´t enjoy the stunning panoramic views that Yosemite offers. A short drive up to Glacier Point can be done with your kids which will offer you unbelievable views of the surrounding valley and most recognizable mountains.

For a real stunning experience, consider driving up around sunset during the full moon phase to watch the sun set and the moon rise. You can also enjoy a unique opportunity for star gazing at Glacier Point to get your kids interested in the heavens above.

Yosemite: So Much Family Fun

These are just a few of the activities that you and your family can enjoy while at Yosemite, but there are virtually unlimited amounts of activities that you can plan for the entire family. Ask the ranger station for other ideas for family centered activities at the park and you´ll soon find that your kids won´t ever want to leave. 

Take Your Kids Camping

One of the best parts of visiting Yosemite is that there are so many fantastic, awe-inspiring camp grounds to choose from. From secluded campgrounds in the middle of the deep back-country, to family friendly campgrounds in the heart of Yosemite Valley, you and your family will be sure to find some place that you love. To get the best possible campground, make sure to plan ahead, make your reservations, and check off all the gear you and your family will need to enjoy the time in the Great Outdoors. Of all camping equipment, the tent is by far the most important and necessary, and it is wise to invest a little bit of time and money in finding a quality tent that will keep you and your family protected while travelling to Yosemite. With this guide you will be able to find the absolute best tent brands on the market so that you can find the option that is best for your trip.

What Each Season Offers

If you can’t make it to Yosemite in the spring, don’t fret. Each of the four seasons in Yosemite offers truly magical sights. The sunny, summer days are rightfully a crowd favorite, and if you don’t like cool temperatures, the warm, dry air is perfect for hiking and getting the best views.

Fall time in Yosemite also offers a way to avoid the crowds since most people stop visiting after Labor Day. The crisp night air often times drives out the summer haze leading to beautiful panoramic views. There is no better time of year to go stargazing at Yosemite than in September or October.

Though many of the parks roads close in winter time, the park service does regularly plow Glacier Point Road up to Badger Pass. Driving up to the pass after a night of snow fall will offer a magical glimpse of Yosemite´s winter wonders.

Furthermore, if you can make it to Yosemite in February, you will get to watch the Firefall, one of the most amazing natural phenomena in the world. The setting sun at that time of year is at such an angle that the sun illuminates Horsetail Falls in such a way that the falls glow orange and red while the sun sets.

 What are the Best Hikes in Yosemite?

With 1,200 square miles, Yosemite is a backpacker and hikers dream. Since the majority of the crowds never leave Yosemite Valley which only makes up 1% of the park, you should be able to find plenty of solitude and untouched, natural beauty, whether that be on the cliffs of a high granite peak or in an unexplored valley. 

Types of Hiking Gear You Should Bring


As you explore the beauty of park,you should always come prepared. A bunch of our staffers don't like to carry around a lot of gear and suggest you bring an ultralight backpack, we also have a pretty indepth guide about the best backpacks for hiking, make sure to give both a read before you set out on your adventure.

Below we offer our five best hikes for true nature lovers. Four of these hikes are day hikes while one can be done as an overnighter.​​​​

Half Dome

This 17 mile round trip hike isn’t for folks who are out of shape. If you think that you have the energy and the stamina to make it up one of the largest granite rocks in the world, however, you will be rewarded with a once in a lifetime experience.

To begin your hike you will go by past two gorgeous waterfalls, Vernal Falls and Nevada Falls, before hiking through thick pine forest. As you approach the top of the granite dome, you will have to pull yourself up with the aid of granite steps (think stairway of hell) and wire cables.

Once you make it to the top, however, the views are otherworldly with sweeping panoramas of Yosemite Valley and the surrounding landscape. You do need a permit to do this day hike so plan in advance.

Upper Yosemite Falls

If you make it Yosemite, you have to at least to try to climb up to the top of North Americas highest waterfall. The upper Yosemite Falls hike is a 7.2 mile round trip hike, though be warned that the majority of the trail is made up of steep, gruesome switchbacks.

Once you make it to the top of the falls, however, you will have gorgeous views of Half Dome and parts of the Yosemite Valley. You will also be able to say that you were at the headwaters of the largest waterfall on the continent.

Taft Point

If you are looking for a less strenuous hike, Taft Point is a relatively easy 2.2 mile round trip hike that takes you to the edge of Yosemite Valley and offers breathtaking views of the park’s main attractions.

You will also get to travel by deep cracks or crevices in the rock that extend several hundred feet downwards, displaying the geological and seismological activity of the park.

Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias

If you have never walked through a towering sequoia forest, it truly is a one of a kind experience that makes you see your life in perspective and consider your relative insignificance in the grand scheme of things.

There are a number of different trails leading through the forest, but you should definitely try and see the Grizzly Giant and the California Tunnel Tree, two of the most iconic giants.

Ostrander Lake

Nothing is quite so pleasant as spending the night camping in the wilderness on the shores of a pristine mountain lake. The Ostrander Lake trail isn’t as popular as some of Yosemite’s other trails, but that is what makes it so desirable.

If you are looking for great wilderness solitude, this 12.7 mile round trip hike will take you through meadows and prairies before climbing steeply to the Lake. You will also be gifted with breathtaking views of the Clark Mountain Range.

Sentinel Meadows

Another fantastic overnighter to get away from the crowds is a hike through Sentinel Meadows. Besides offering fantastic views of pristine meadows and wildflowers, you also have your best bet of viewing grizzly bears along this trail.

The Sentinel Meadows Trail is managed by the Firehole Bear Management Area and is closed until Memorial Day Weekend every year. Once it opens, however, you have a pretty good chance of sighting a grizzly bear or two. Make sure to use precaution, but enjoy the adventure.

Best Mountain Climbing Adventures

For folks who are looking for more of an adrenaline rush than what hiking offers, there are a number of opportunities to mountain climb throughout the park. Yosemite is often considered to be a mountain climbers dream with numerous sheer granite cliffs and vertical faces over 3,000 feet high.

Below we offer some advice on two of the best climbs for adrenaline junkies. Make sure to check for any closures before planning your trip as the park often times unexpectedly closes a route for restoration. Also, if you are looking for guided mountain climbing trips, consider Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides (http://www.symg.com/trips/rockclimbing/)

Serenity Crack

This monster of a climb is one of the best crack climbs you can find. It is also a relatively easy climb for beginners since it is basically a manufactured climb with plenty of pin scars making it easy to find your way to the top.

Northwest Face of Half Dome

Climbing half dome is on every mountain climber´s bucket list. The granite face of Half Dome looks almost unclimbable from the base, but once you get started, you will find it impossible to turn around. During your ascent, there are a number of places where curious hikers will admire your insanity as you take the “short cut” to the top.

You will need a partner and lots of problem solving ability to be able to master this climb though most of the climbing in itself is actually moderate if you pick the right route.

Places To Stay

Originally we had a small section here of places to stay. To put nicely... We didn't do an amazing job of maintaining it.  

If you are interested in checking out the original listing or would like to add your hotel or place to stay, check out the article here.


The Wonder of Yosemite

The incredibly varied landscape of Yosemite offers so many different, unique views and adventure activities that pretty much anyone find something they love. From meandering through groves of giant Sequoias to climbing up a sheer granite face, Yosemite National Park is one place that everyone should visit.

Near By Cities

  • Although it's a bit of a drive, San Francisco is around a 3 hour drive away. 
  • Fresno is also pretty close and totally worth checking out!
  • Sacramento is also pretty close and worth checking out! 

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Has this article got you thinking about Camping? Remember to keep your food fresh & drinks cool with our recommended camping coolers. Check our guide it before you plan your next trip. We think you'll enjoy it.

Best Hikes In Yosemite Valley

One of the best parts about visiting Yosemite National Park is going on different kinds of hikes in Yosemite Valley. You can get some incredible views by going on these hikes through this valley. Millions of tourists come to Yellowstone every year because they enjoy the variety of hikes that are possible along with the numerous amounts of outdoor activities that you can partake in too. Most people who come to Yellowstone do not enjoy hiking so you may be able to have some peace of mind by getting away from the large crowds in the spring or summer by being able to go hiking on the trails.

Half Dome

Difficulty: Very Strenuous
Distance: 17 miles for a round-trip
Hiking Time: 12 to 14 hours depending upon expertise level
Elevation Change: 4,800 feet

Trailhead: The route to the top starts with the Happy Isles, which is shuttle stop #16. You are going to need to follow the Mist Trail to the top of Nevada Fall. Lastly, you’ll follow the signs leading you to the top of Half Dome.

Half Dome has the distinguished reputation of being the most popular hiking destination in the valley. While it is the most famous of all the hiking trails, it is also the most challenging to do. You have to ascend over 8.5 miles to reach the summit and then it’s another 8.5 miles back to complete the trail. The actual hike can take up to two days or less. You have to be in top physical and mental shape in order to accomplish this hike. You may need to use metal cables and a harness in order to help yourself to the summit. You need to be strong to make it to the top but once you do, you’ll be rewarded with some of the best views in the whole Yosemite National Park.

Mist Trail

Difficulty: Strenuous
Distance: 3 miles for a round-trip
Hiking Time: 3 to 4 hours total
Elevation Change: 1,000 feet

Trailhead: The Mist Trail also starts within the Happy Isles like the Half Dome trail. You can go to the shuttle stop #16, which is at the eastern end of the Yosemite Valley. After you get to that shuttle stop, you need to cross the stone bridge and follow the path to the left.

While Half Dome is the most famous and the most strenuous trail, Mist Trail is the most popular with Yellowstone hikers. It’s pretty popular because you can see some of the most amazing scenery when you’re hiking along the trail. You can go by the banks of the Merced River and then head up the stone steps to see the Vernal Fall, which is 317 feet high and is an amazing and awe-inspiring waterfall. You should be aware that this particular trail could get quite crowded especially during the summer season at Yellowstone. However, if you’re not looking for too much of a challenge but want to see the beauty of the national park, Mist Trail is a good option.

Nevada Fall

Difficulty: Strenuous
Distance: 7 miles for a round-trip
Hiking Time: 4 to 5 hours
Elevation Change: 1,900 feet

Trailhead: At the end of the Mist Trail, start at the top of Vernal Fall on the way to Nevada Fall.

From the Mist Trail, it’s pretty easy to go on the Nevada Fall hike afterwards. It only takes a little over a mile from there to get to the top of the Nevada Fall at about 600 feet. You’ll have much less hikers to deal with since it’s less popular than the Mist Trail and you can get a lot of beautiful, and scenic views there too. In order to return to the beginning of the trail, you can loop around back using the John Muir Trail.

Yosemite Falls

Difficulty: Strenuous
Distance: 7.6 miles for a round-trip
Hiking Time: 4 to 5 hours
Elevation Change: 2,600 feet

Trailhead: Begin at Camp 4 to start the trail. Then, you’ll take a shuttle to Yosemite Lodge, which is Stop #7 to cross the street to Camp 4. The hike starts between the camping ground and the parking lot.

To get to some beautiful waterfalls that are over 2,000 feet in total height, you’ll have to undergo the strenuous hike of Yosemite Falls. It will not be easy physically, you’ll sweat a lot, and it will be a long way up to the top, but the views of Yosemite Falls are truly incredible. You can even see the Upper Yosemite Fall after going up the 135 switchbacks in total. You’ll be able to go above the waterfall itself to see the entire area. If you’re not willing to put in all of that effort, you can go to the Columbia Point instead, which is only about 1.2 miles away from the trailhead. It’s not as strenuous of a hike, and you will still get some great views of the valley.

Four Mile Trail

Difficulty: Strenuous
Distance: 9.2 miles for a round-trip
Hiking Time: 5 to 7 hours
Elevation Change: 3,200 feet

Trailhead: To begin the Four Mile Trail, you’re going to need to go between Sentinel Beach and the Swinging Bridge on Southside Drive.

While millions of tourists come to Glacier Drive for the spectacular views, you can earn them and get some exercise by going through the Four Mile Trail. It’s a great hiking trail because you can get clear views of all of Yosemite Falls. If you don’t want to hike the 3,200 feet up to the top of Glacier Point, you can choose to take a shuttle bus up there instead and just hike down the 3,200 feet down into Yosemite Valley. If you want more than just the Four Mile Trail, which is actually over nine miles round trip, you should consider doing the 11.5 mile hike, which includes the scenic Panorama Trail and ends at the Mist Trail. If you’ve got the energy, it’s one of the best hiking trails in Yosemite on par with Half Dome in terms of its’ difficulty and also its’ reward.

RELATED CONTENT

Start planning for your next trip now! Know the perfect time to visit the national park. Check this guide: The Best Times to Visit Yosemite

What are the Best Places to Camp in Yosemite?

If you really want to get the full and immersive experience at Yosemite National Park, camping there overnight or for a couple of nights with some friends or your family is a great way to experience both the wilderness and the wildlife. When it comes to the number of total campsites at Yosemite, it is estimated that there are about 1,445 with thirteen different campgrounds to choose from. You can reserve up to 1,000 campsites in advance, which is recommended to do especially during the peak season at Yosemite, which is June, July, and August. Luckily, these campsites are freely available to the public and are filled up on a first-come, first-serve basis. You should try to reserve your campsite a couple of months in advance because one these campsites become available, they usually are booked within an hour or so of becoming available online. If you plan on staying at a campsite or campground during the weekend, you need to keep in mind that there is going to be a high level of competition for those spots. In case the campgrounds at Yosemite become full, there are a number of campgrounds near the national park that you can choose to camp at instead.

What are the Best Places to Camp in Yosemite?

This question can be up for debate because there are over a dozen or more unique campgrounds to choose from. However, there tends to be a consensus that the most popular and well-known campgrounds are the Lower Pines Campground, the Upper Pines Campground, Camp 4, and the Tuolumne Campground. It’s important to be aware of the positives and the negatives of each campground because they’re not perfect but some campgrounds are better than others in terms of comfort and other factors.

Camping in Yosemite Valley

If you want to get the best experience with camping, you may want to consider choosing a campground in the Yosemite Valley where there are four options. Because of the beautiful granite cliffs and stunning waterfalls, it’s the most popular part of Yosemite National Park so the campgrounds are likely to fill up quickly if you don’t reserve ahead of time. The campgrounds at Yosemite Valley aren’t too high up with the elevation being only 4,000 feet. You’re likely to have a comfortable time there due to the fact that there are bathrooms with running water and toilets that flush. Hot showers are also available to purchase for a small fee if you want to warm up a bit. Yosemite Valley also has a free shuttle that you can take between the four different campgrounds that are available to camp in.

Lower Pines Campground

Open: From April until October
Cost: $26 per night

Lower Pines Campground has about sixty different campsites available near the southern banks of the Merced River. It is quite popular due to its location where you can see nice views of the Half Dome and be located right next to the river. Some people consider this campground the best that the Yosemite National Park has to offer. Because it’s so popular, you should try to reserve your campsite months in advance especially if you’re planning to visit during the summer season. If you’re bringing an RV to the campsite, make sure that its’ length doesn’t exceed forty feet.

North Pines Campground

Open: From March until October
Cost: $26 per night

On the other side of the Merced River, located near the riverbanks is the North Pines Campgrounds, which is also considered to be one of the best campgrounds in Yosemite. Because of the popularity of this campground, you should book and reserve your campsite months in advance in order to secure a spot. Luckily, there are over eighty campsites at North Pines to choose from. It’s also not too far from Lower Pines if you decide to go there to visit people or check out the views from there.

Upper Pines Campground

Open: The entire year
Cost: $26 per night

Known as being the 2nd largest campground in all of Yosemite National Park, Upper Pines is located on the eastern end of the Yosemite Valley and is close to the two other pines campgrounds. Upper Pines has over two hundred and forty campsites to choose from and is open year round for visitors and tourists alike. However, you will need to make a reservation from mid-March to November due to the increased amount of campsite requests. However, from December to the beginning of March, campsites are available on the usual first-come, first-serve basis.

Camp 4

Open: The entire year
Cost: $6 per night

Camp 4 has the distinction of being the only campground that you can book on a first-come, first serve basis from the high season months of April to November. There are only thirty-five campsites available so demand is quite high. It’s important to book your campsite at Camp 4 about six months in advance depending on when you plan to visit the campground. This campground is not that big so you will not be able to park your car, RV, or trailer. There are parking areas nearby so you’ll have to put your vehicle there first before walking in to the campground. There are also no pets like dogs allowed so you’re going to have to leave Fido at home. If you enjoy rock climbing, Camp 4 is the most popular campground for that activity in Yosemite Valley. Because of its’ proximity to El Capitan or other hiking trails, Camp 4 remains one of the best campgrounds in Yosemite National Park.

Camping in Glacier Point Road

There are campgrounds available for the sixteen miles that go from Wawona Road to Glacier Point. Glacier Point is located thousands of feet above Yosemite Valley and has really nice views of Half Dome, Nevada Falls, etc. There are a number of hiking trails nearby so it’s pretty easy to go on day hikes through this part of the national park.

Bridalveil Creek Campground

Open: From June/July until September
Cost: $18 per night

The most popular campground located along Glacier Point Road, you can get to the Bridalveil Creek campground in about an hour driving up from the Yosemite Valley. During the high season of April to November, it’s first-come and first-serve. There are over one hundred and ten campsites to choose from so it’s a bigger campground overall. RVs and Trailers are allowed to park within the campground too without any problems.

Camping in Big Oak Flat Road

Big Oak Flat Road is a long road that is about seventeen miles in length that winds up to Yosemite Valley. While it’s not very scenic, you can easily access the Merced Grove of Giant Sequoias without needing to drive your car or RV. You can also be close to Yosemite Valley, where the two campgrounds along the Big Oak Flat Road are located.

Crane Flat Campground

Open: From July to October
Cost: $26 per night

The location of Crane Flat is perfect if you want to be close to the famed Yosemite Valley. It’s only about fifteen miles away from Yosemite Valley and you can drive there in about thirty minutes. You can easily make a reservation in advance up to a couple of months and there are over one hundred and sixty campsites available at any given time during the year. You can also drive your RV or car to park within the campground.

Hodgdon Meadow Campground

Open: The entire year
Cost: $26 per night

Hodgdon Meadow also has a very good location in that it’s located close by to the Big Oak Flat Entrance Station and is about twenty-five miles away from Yosemite Valley, which is about a forty-five minute drive. While there are only about one hundred and five campsites, you’re still have the ability to make a reservation in advance from the high season of April to October. Otherwise, during the months of November to March, it’s on a first-come, first-serve basis that comes with no reservation. You can bring your RV or a car in to the campground as well.

Camping in Tioga Road

If you want to be in the heart of Yosemite National Park, you’ll want to go camping along Tioga Road. You can experience being close to the High Sierra Mountains where there is great scenery of the alpine and maple trees. You can also check out Tuolumne Meadows, which is accessible by car from Tioga Road. All campgrounds along Tioga Road are available on a first-come, first-serve basis making it more accessible than other campgrounds in Yosemite. However, because of uncertain weather conditions it is possible that some of these campgrounds will not be open during the winter months.

Tamarack Flat Campground

Open: From July to October
Cost: $12 per night

Tamarack Flat Campground is located in the southern part of Tioga Road and is a couple of miles east from Big Oak Flat Road. There are only over fifty campsites available and you’ll need to set up a tent if you plan to stay there overnight. It is not a very big campsite so you’re going to need to leave your RV or your car in another parking area because those vehicles can’t enter this campground.

White Wolf Campground

Open: From July to September
Cost: $18 per night

White Wolf campground is in a good location. This campground is located halfway between Yosemite Valley and Tuolumne Meadows and you can drive to both locations within an hour or so. There are over seventy campsites, which are all first-come, first-serve so you won’t need to make a reservation in advance. The elevation of this campsite is high up at 8,000 feet so bring a jacket because temperatures can be quite cold at night. You can bring your RV or another type of vehicle into the campground.

Yosemite Creek Campground

Open: from July to September
Cost: $12 per night

Just a stone’s throw from White Wolf is the Yosemite Creek campground. There are seventy-five campsites available for use on a first-come, first-serve basis. There are a variety of ways that you can do to get the most out of this campsite. You can set up a tent to spend a few nights there. However, there are no RVs or Trailers allowed in this campsite. Because of the elevation is high at almost 8,000 feet, temperatures can be cold at night. This campground is along the creek itself so it’s in a beautiful location. You can also hike to the top of Yosemite Falls if you want to check out the views from there.

Porcupine Flat Campground

Open: From July to October

Cost: $12 per night

If you want to be right next to Tuolumne Meadows, the Porcupine Flat campground is an ideal choice. It is entirely a first-come, first-serve campground and is very busy during the summer season, especially since it’s cheaper than other campgrounds. There are over fifty campsites and you can use your RV or car when you’re at the site. Bring a jacket though because it gets cold at night due to being at 8,000 feet in elevation.

Camping in Tuolumne Meadows

If you want to be at the base of the High Sierra Mountains, being at a campground in the Tuolumne Meadows is the way to go. The scenery is spectacular and you can cool off in the meadows if you decide to camp there.

Tuolumne Meadows Campground

Open: From July to September
Cost: $26 per night

Tuolumne Meadows Campground has the double distinction of being the biggest campsite in Yosemite National Park at over three hundred available spots as well as being the highest in terms of elevation at over 8,600 feet. For half of the campsites, you need to reserve in advance, and for the rest of them are first-come and first-serve.

Wawona Campground

Open: The entire year
Cost: $26 per night

Over ninety campsites that are at the southern fork of the Merced River, the Wawona Campground is a pleasant site located not too far from the Yosemite Valley, and where you can reserve a spot especially when it comes to high season from April to October. You can park your RV, trailer, or car there as well during your stay at Wawona.

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Check out this guide: Best Hikes In Yosemite Valley

Complete Guide to Yellowstone National Park

How complete is this guide?

The answer? Not very complete. Like most national parks, this place is pretty big. In fact, you can likely write a book or two about it. ​ If you feel something is missing or needs to be updated, you are welcome to contact us and contribute.

Introduction

When you think of national parks, chances are that Yellowstone National Park is one of the first things that comes to mind. The iconic landscape of this massive piece of land is synonymous with raw beauty, untouched wilderness areas, and ridiculously amazing landscapes. Throw in the fact that Yellowstone is one of the most seismically active places in the world, and you´ve got the recipe for a truly one of a kind natural experience.

Yellowstone National Park, is a pretty huge place; almost 3,500 square miles to be exact. Trying to plan a weekend getaway or even a weeklong vacation can seem like a pretty tall task with so many different options and attractions. In this complete guide to Yellowstone National Park, we´ll do our best to guide you through all of the different attractions that are available to you and your family so that your next trip to Yellowstone will be unforgettable and unique.

Yellowstone National Park History

While many of us might think that Yellowstone began once it was formally declared a national park, indigenous people have been living in the park for well over 11,000 years; following the herds of buffalo over the mountains and plains. There are over 1,000 archaeological sites scattered throughout the park giving testament to the rich, anthropological history of the area.

In the early 1800´s, during the Lewis and Clark expedition, John Colter, accidentally got separated from the expedition while off trapping animals. He eventually found his way to what is now a portion of Yellowstone National Park. He suffered through an entire winter in the park occasionally fighting with indigenous tribes that inhabited the area and miraculously survived.

When he eventually made it back to the expedition, he told tales of a place that reeked of fire and brimstone (in apparent allusion to the geysers and seismic activity). The rest of the group thought his tales to be the result of too many months out in nature by himself and playfully referred to the place as “Colter´s Hell.”

During the Civil War, in 1862, the area which now compromises Yellowstone was given over to the Department of the Interior. Ten years later, the U.S. Congress and President Teddy Roosevelt the union general who fought during the Civil War, declared Yellowstone a national park, the first ever national park on a worldwide scale.

Yellowstone National Park gets its name from the nearby Yellowstone River which has its headwaters within the park boundaries. The Yellowstone River was named by a pair of French Trappers who translated the river from the native Hidatsa name for the river, which roughly translates as Rock Yellow River.

Since being founded as a national park, Yellowstone has continued to attract the wonder and fascination of millions of people from around the world.

If you do enjoy hiking, however, you´ll find over 1,000 miles of trails throughout the park.

What’s Going On Underneath Your Feet: The Geology of Yellowstone National Park?

One of the biggest attractions of Yellowstone National Park is the hundreds of geysers that dot the landscape throughout the park. While some of them, like Old Faithful, “erupt” every certain amount of time, others are simply unpredictable, making this land of “fire and brimstone” as it was called by one early explorer, a landscape unlike any other. But what causes Yellowstone to be such a hotbed of seismic activity?

Yellowstone National Park sits on top of the northeastern part of the North American Tectonic Plate. Directly underneath this tectonic plate is a stationary mantle hotspot of lava, magma, and other signs of seismic activity. Since Yellowstone is on the boundary of this plate, there are hundreds of places throughout the park where the hotspot just below the earth´s crust emerges to the surface in the form of geysers, hot springs, and sulfur spouts.

Furthermore, the Yellowstone Caldera is the largest volcanic system in North America, commonly called a “super volcano” because of the strength and frequency of the eruptions. When you´re hiking across Yellowstone, a thin crust of earth and rock is all that separates you from one of the largest magma chambers in the world that is thought to be 37 miles long, 18 miles wide and up to 7 miles deep!

Over half a million years ago, a massive volcanic eruption, over 1,000 times more powerful than the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in nearby Washington, created the current landscape and seismic activity. This eruption was so powerful that many scientists consider that it shaped the weather patterns that characterize our current civilization.

This extremely powerful history has left the landscape of Yellowstone with over 10,000 geothermal features including hotspots, geysers, hot springs and much more. Over 2/3 of the world´s geysers are located within the boundaries of the National Park.

Though you shouldn´t be too concerned, hundreds of scientists in collaboration with the U.S. government have set up a permanent station at Yellowstone to study the possibility of future mega-volcanic explosions. Taking a trip to Yellowstone, then, should be considered an adrenaline pumping experience, knowing that you´re visiting a place that could potentially explode at any minute!

Hiking in Yellowstone National Park

With over a thousand miles of trail and 3,500 square miles of mostly wilderness area, Yellowstone certainly has more than enough areas to explore. While it is hard to narrow down the list of “must-do” hikes to just a few, we´ve attempted to give you list of the top five day hikes at Yellowstone that will introduce you to the incredibly rich and diverse landscape of the park. For more options, be sure to visit the Visitor´s Center once you get to the park, and always check with park rangers since some trails are periodically closed off due to abnormally high geothermal activity.

Uncle Tom's Trail

From the South Rim of the Yellowstone Canyon Area, Uncle Tom´s Trail offers a short but strenuous hike that will give you some fantastic views of some of the best waterfalls in the park. The trail is actually a metal staircase that will take you down 328 steps to the rim of Yellowstone Canyon. The views of the canyon and the Lower falls are spectacular, though the hike back up will certainly tire you out. It´s not every day, however, that you´re able to descend into a steep canyon without the use of ropes and climbing gear.

Lava Creek Trail

This 8 mile round trip hike leaves near the Mammoth Campground. If you´re looking for a quality hike that will take you by rivers and creeks, through steep canyons, and also offer quality overlooks, this is the hike for you. If you´re lucky, you might also catch a glimpse of a herd of buffalo passing through the river which is a sight definitely worth seeking out.

Mount Washburn Trail

Just north of Canyon Village, you will be able to find the Mount Washburn Trailhead. This 6.4 mile round tripper is a fairly easy hike with only a few moderate uphill climbs making it a great option for a family hike. There are several sweeping lookout points that will give you access to incredible scenery. These lookout stations are also some of the best places in the park to look for wildlife including grizzly bears, buffalo, and everything in between.

Fairy Falls Trail

If you make a reservation to see one of Old Faithful´s early eruptions, don´t head back to camp right away. Just north of the Old Faithful Geyser you will find the Fairy Falls trailhead. This easy 5 mile round trip hike will take you very near the Midway Geyser Basin and the Grand Prismatic Spring. The Grand Prismatic Spring is easily the most colorful geyser in the whole park and will remind you of a deserted Caribbean beach, minus the not so lovely smell of sulfur. There is also a new growth forest that can help young children understand the importance of reforestation efforts.

Backpacking in Yellowstone National Park

Not every traveler or visitor to Yellowstone is content with the short and fairly easy day hikes. While the day hikes definitely show you some of the most unique features of Yellowstone, they are also usually pretty crowded with tourists, especially during the summer months. If you´re wanting to explore a bit of the less explored areas of Yellowstone, below you´ll find several quality backpacking trips that will take you into the places inhabited by only buffalo and grizzly bears. 

Our fellow backpackers like to use an ultralight backpack to carry all their gear. Check out our ultralight backpack reviews. We also made a pretty in-depth guide about the best hiking backpacks available in the market today. It's all in this post. Make sure to check it out before your great adventure.

Sky Rim Trail

The Sky Rim Trail is a one of a kind backcountry trail that traverses the Gallatin Mountain Range in the northwestern part of the park. Bordering the park is the Gallatin National Forest, and this trail takes you right along the edge of the park. The 21 mile round trip is strenuous at times, especially during the summit of the 9,899 foot Big Horn Peak. Once you make it up to the top, however, you´ll be rewarded with some of the best panoramic views the park has to offer, including an uninterrupted view all the way to the Grand Teton National Park which you can see on a clear day. 

Another attraction of this trail is the herds of sheep, found appropriately on Sheep Mountain, another moderately difficult summit that you´ll have to cross. Start your trip at the Dailey Creek Trail, and if you plan to spend a night or two camping on the trail, apply for a backcountry permit and seek out the best view for a perfect night. There are frequent afternoon storms, so be careful when picking the best spot for camping. Make sure you bring a durable and waterproof tent to get you through those stormy nights. We have made a list of all the quality tent brands you should check out before your big adventure.

Thunderer Cutoff/Cache Creek Hike

This is only an 18.5 mile hike, but the scenery is so astounding that you will want to stretch it into a day or two hike. Also located in northeastern Yellowstone which is one of the least developed parts of the park, this trail starts at the Thunderer Cutoff trail before taking you through the Cache Creek drainage all the way to the Lamar River where you´ll meet up with the relatively easy Lamar Creek Trail.

This trail is only meant for serious backpackers as you´ll spend a little bit of time off the trail through creek beds, but is well worth it if you have some basic navigational skills. Just before you make it to the Lamar River, you´ll be able to see Death Gulch, which is a geothermal basin for Wahb Springs. If you want to (carefully) explore some of the geothermal activity of the park on your own, this is a great opportunity.

Near the Cache Creek and Lamar River you have a pretty good chance of running into herds of bison as well, so make sure to be on the lookout for all sorts of wildlife.

Mary Mountain Trail

This 20 mile backpacking trip will take you into a different part of Yellowstone which may make you feel like you´re in a completely different ecosystem. The thick grasslands of the Central Plateau of Yellowstone are the favorite abode of the herds of bison, and you might find that you run into a traffic jam of buffalo during your trip.

For adventure seekers who have always wanted to look for a grizzly bear in the wild, this is most likely the best place to do it. Fatal bear attacks have occurred in this area, so take precaution and make lots of noise to alert the bears of your presence.

This unique trail starts in the grasslands, rises through thick pine forest before taking you to Mary Lake, a charming small mountain lake which is synonymous with true wilderness.

Family Activities at Yellowstone National Park

You don´t have to venture into the wilderness to brave the bears and bison in order to enjoy Yellowstone. There are dozens of family oriented and family centered activities that make Yellowstone a great place for a memorable family vacation. Below we´ll explore four different activities that can be enjoyed in family and leave your kids with lifelong memories of the beauty of this one of a kind national park.

Visit the Geysers

Without a doubt, one of the best attractions of Yellowstone for young kids is seeing the super-hot and sulfur-smelling water erupt hundreds of feet into the air in the form of geysers. A child´s imagination can run wild when contemplating these truly unique spectacles along with boiling mud pots, steam vents, and hot springs that look like a tropical beach.

The Upper Geyser Basin has the highest amount and concentration of geothermal features anywhere in the park (and in the world, for that matter). A nice boardwalk makes for an easy path allowing kids to see the unique geothermal features while also keeping them at a safe distance. Midway Geyser Basin is home to the world´s largest hot spring and is also a family friendly place to stop.

A Family Bike Ride

Though you might not want to take young kids for a cycling tour on the paved roads that you´ll have to share with cars, Yellowstone National Park also has hundreds of miles of dirt roads that are open to mountain biking.

Blacktail Plateau Drive is a sweet seven mile trip through meadows, mountains and forests and will definitely get you some great opportunities for wildlife sighting. Another good family ride to consider is the 5 mile cruise along the Old Gardiner road which is graveled. This old road is the best place in the park to spot elk and pronghorn which might be a bit safer for young kids that going into the heart of grizzly country.

There are several places around the park where you can rent bikes, including near the Old Faithful Geyser which allows you to explore some of the geothermal activity in the area from the safety of your bike.

Horseback Riding

If you´re not a huge fan of pedaling, signing up for a horseback riding trip is the quintessential family activity, and you´d be hard pressed to find better scenery for a trip that at Yellowstone National Park. The wide open meadows and plains of Yellowstone make it a perfect place for a horseback ride and can get younger children a higher vantage point to spot distant wildlife and appreciate the views.

There are a number of horseback riding outfits in and around the park, and you could even sign up for a covered wagon ride so that you and your family can get the true Wild West historical experience. Most horse operations require children to be at least eight years old to sign up, so make sure to plan accordingly.

White Water Rafting

Trying to hold on to your tube while going through a class five rapid might not sound like a great family activity, but the rivers that run through Yellowstone National Park have a number of easy to moderate rapids that are family friendly. The Yellowstone River, Madison River, and Snake Rivers all offer cool rafting expeditions, with the Snake River being the most intense of the three.

Some rafting companies even offer complete packets that combine zip lines with white water rafting adventures; a perfect combination for family fun. It's not a necessity to go through a company, you can take your own white water inflatable kayak or canoe to go rafting yourself, but be safe and go with people.

Other Things Not to Miss at Yellowstone National Park

There simply isn´t enough space here to list ALL the great things to do and places to explore around Yellowstone. One of the most unique aspects of this park is that its natural biodiversity allows it to offer all different types of activities for different people. While the vast majority of visitors to the park stick to the most well-known attractions, getting “off the beaten path” and doing things that most visitors would never think of is a way to make your Yellowstone trip stand apart from the rest. Below you´ll find a couple of quality options to spice up your trip to Yellowstone.

Avoid the Grandstands to see Old Faithful

Old Faithful is arguably the park´s most well-known and famous feature. Especially during the summer months, thousands of people line up to see it´s timed explosions. The park has even built bleachers too help accommodate the crowds but if you don´t get there on time, chances are that you´ll be trying to see the eruption over the head of someone in front of you.

For a more “private” showing of and Old Faithful eruption, simply walk around to the back of the geyser along the boardwalk. From there, you can leisurely hang your feet over the boardwalk and watch Old Faithful erupt without all the fanfare of hundreds of other tourists crowded around you.

Get a Private View of Yellowstone´s Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon of Yellowstone is another favorite for tourists, along with the beautiful Upper and Lower Falls at the canyon. Instead of trying to meditate on the beauty of nature while surrounded by hundreds of talkative tourists, try this alternative, little-known path to get a view with solitude of the Canyon and the falls.

From the Upper Falls parking lot, walk left of the overlook (most of the crowds just go to the overlook). A short trail over two wooden bridges will get you a beautiful view of the upper fall complete with rainbows and mist. Best of all is that you will most likely have the place all to yourself.

Try Out a Naturally Jacuzzi in a Thermal Pool

While most of the thermal pools around Yellowstone are so hot that they´d end up giving your third degree burns, there is one gem of a pool that allows you to swim in it comfortably. Not many tourists know of this tiny, thermal pool, but it´s only a ten minute drive from Mammoth.

Head north until you reach a sign that says “welcome to Montana.” There, park on the right side of the road where you see a trailhead. Only 1/3 of a mile up the path you will find the Boiling River which is (as its name implies) a thermal river that is boiling hot. Though you can´t bathe there, a couple more minutes up the path and you´ll find that the Boiling River flows into the Gardiner River (which is a regular cold water river.

Where these two rivers meet you´ll find a perfect mix of hot and cold waters and steam rising up around you. This unique thermal pool is truly a one of a kind Yellowstone experience.

Watch the Bison Take a Steam Bath

If you are wanting to get a National Geographic-esque wildlife picture while at Yellowstone, Mud Volcano offers you a great chance for a great shot. Herds of buffalo usually enjoy the Yellowstone River near Mud Volcano, and a couple of geysers rising out of the river banks are also a place the bison go to warm up. Getting a shot of these majestic animals while geothermal steam rises up around them with the Yellowstone River in the background is definitely Instagram worthy.

Best Time of Year to Visit Yellowstone National Park

The vast majority of tourists show up to Yellowstone during the summer months and for good reason. The summer weather at Yellowstone averages a comfortable 75 degrees and offers long days of sunlight. At the same time, all the park attractions are open (unless unexpected geothermal activity is occurring). The downside of visiting Yellowstone during the summer, however, is the crowds which can be suffocating, especially at some of the most famous attractions such as Old Faithful.

In the spring months of April and May, you´ll be able to miss the biggest crowds, though the weather is unpredictable. Temperatures can rise into the 60´s, but a snowfall isn´t out of the question either. Some of the main roads will probably be closed until mid April meaning that some things will be off limits. However, the beauty of watching the park emerge from its winter hibernation is well worth the extra cold.

Early fall time is our recommendation for the best time to visit Yellowstone. The weather is still decent while the main summer crowds will have started to diminish. It´s also a great time to see certain types of wild flowers while the bison and other wildlife will just out foraging before the winter months hit.

Winter at Yellowstone is a treat for adrenaline seekers. Be forewarned that the park experiences heavy snowfall and bitter cold. However, if you come prepared, you´ll get the deepest type of solitude and some truly magnificent winter scenery.

Conclusion

There aren´t many places in our world where you can go and say that you were walking around the mouth of a super volcano ready to erupt at any moment. Yellowstone National Park offers visitors a unique perspective of the geothermal activity going on just below the earth´s crust. At the same time, Yellowstone is a place alive with herds of bison, elk and pronghorn and one of the best places in the lower 48 states to see a grizzly bear.

In this complete guide to Yellowstone National Park, we´ve done our best to choose some of the best hikes, backpacking trips, family activities, and other unique activities to make your Yellowstone experience truly unforgettable.

Top Five Overnight Hikes in Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is one of the most visited national parks in the United States, and rightfully so. The beautiful mountains, pristine rivers, herds of wild buffalo, blazing hot springs and Geysers and so much more make this place a truly one of a kind environment.

It can be frustrating, however, to head to Yellowstone in hopes of getting a taste of the natural wilderness only to find that everywhere you go, you are surrounded by thousands of talkative tourists whose radios, picture taking and the like kind of takes the magic out of the moment.

While Yellowstone is known for drawing a crowd, there are also some fantastic places you can go to get away from the crowds and experience the essence of the wildness of one of America´s most iconic national parks. Below you´ll find information on five fantastic overnight hikes in Yellowstone National Park.

Ice Lake and Chain of Lakes

If you are looking for a hike that will take you away from the crowds as quickly as possible, this is the option for you. While it is only a 1.4 mile hike to this backcountry campground, that is more than enough distance to separate you from the majority of tourists who frown upon carrying their bed in a backpack.

They call this trail the chain of lakes because the trail follows a number of mountain lakes that form in descending fashion throughout the mountain. Ice Lake is the closest one, and you can choose how far you plan to go. Wolf Lake is about a 4 mile hike making it a bit more secluded than Ice Lake.

Howard Eaton Trail

For experienced backcountry backpackers who like the thrill of trying to blaze their own trail, the Howard Eaton Trail offers a unique challenge. This trail hasn’t been maintained in a number of years. While there are still parts of it where a trail is recognizable, other parts have been lost to vegetation.

Trying to find your way along a lost trail offers a healthy dose of adrenaline to anyone. Throw in the fact that this is prime grizzly bear country and you´ll find yourself instantly on your toes during the entirety of the hike. The old Howard Eaton Trail is the best place in the park for people wanting to explore on their own.

Bighorn Pass

If you want a little longer hike, the Bighorn Pass backpacking trip will take you close to 9 miles into the wilderness. This hike takes you along the Gallatin River and is one of the best places to find black bears, grizzly bears, and herds of elk.

There are a number of backpacker only campsites along the way and you might even be able to find a campsite near a marmot colony. Their friendly chirping will keep you entertained throughout the night.

Lamar River

The best place in the whole park to see the Lamar Valley and offers perhaps the best scenic, panoramic views. Furthermore, along the Lamar River you will most likely find bison footprints, and if you know how to recognize, the iconic gray wolf.

This area is known as the American Serengeti because of the huge amount of wildlife including bear, elk, antelope, wolves, and much more.

How to Get In to the Backcountry at Yellowstone

To get away from the crowds at Yellowstone, you can´t simply take a tent and sleeping bag and head into the wilderness. All backcountry travelers and campers need a permit to camp outside of the regular campgrounds.

You will need to apply at least 48 hours ahead of your planned trip. If you are planning to hike during peak summer season, you might also find that many of the backcountry campsites that you wanted to reserve have already been reserved, so plan accordingly.

The Hidden Wonders of Yellowstone

If you have seen Old Faithful and done some of the more common day hikes at Yellowstone but want to get away from the crowds, the backcountry of Yellowstone offers a glimpse into a whole different side of this classic National Park. Do your planning ahead of time and pick any of these five fantastic backpacking trips to get a taste of the unspoiled wilderness of Yellowstone.

Top 7 Day Hikes in Washington State

Rainforests and Open Meadows

Washington State isn’t often considered to be one of the most ecologically diverse states of our country. Nestled into the top northwestern corner of the United States, it often gets passed up on for other supposedly more exotic locations for hiking.

The difference between eastern and western Washington are so striking, however, that it might feel like you´ve travelled across the world after a short 5 hour car drive. From the lush Cascade Mountains and the Hoh Rainforests in the western part of the state to the dry, wheat fields and prairies of the eastern part of the state, Washington offers a number of uniquely different ecosystems and environments.

A fantastic vacation idea would be to start in the Spokane area of eastern Washington and drive all the way to the Pacific Ocean. Along the way be sure to check out some of these awe-inspiring day hikes.

Oregon Butte

The Blue Mountains in the south-eastern part of Washington aren’t as famous as their western counterparts, but they still have plenty to offer. The ridgeline trail that goes through the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness will take you to a beautiful overlook. On a clear day you will be able to see down into the valley of wheat fields and open spaces.

Tolmie Peak Lookout - Eunice Lake

There is something undeniably magical about mountain lakes, and the Tolmie Peak Lookout stairs down into the pristine Eunice Lake which shines like a sapphire amidst an emerald green softwood forest.

Located near Mount Rainier National Park, this simple day hike will offer you beautiful views of one of the most iconic peaks in the state of Washington while also taking you up to almost 6,000 feet elevation.

South Coldwater Trail

Mount Saint Helen´s might not be as active as it was a couple of decades ago, but this trail in the South Cascades region offers you a pretty unique experience. You will be able to take in pretty cool views of the old volcano itself while also appreciating the roaming herds of elk.

The South Coldwater Trail rambles through treeless valleys which still give testament to the power of destruction that Mount Saint Helens caused. At the same time, the renewed landscape filled with wild flowers speaks to the power and resiliency of the natural world.

Sunrise Ridge

In the northern part of the Olympic Mountains you can find a unique trail in Sunrise Ridge. This trail which is within Olympic National Park is a wildflower-lover´s delight. If you time it right you will find field upon field of every type of wildflower including lupine, larkspur and everything in between. This is also a great trail to come upon all sorts of wildlife.

Hoh Rainforest Trail

Really? A rainforest in the United States. While many of us might think that rainforests only exist in Brazil or Indonesia, the United States does have its own swath of untouched, virgin rainforest in the Hoh National Park.

Walking through the lush greenness of the Hoh Rainforest Trail is an experience unlike any other. Monstrous trees hung with thick moss and the unending song of hidden birds will make you feel like you´re in another country. The relatively open understory allows you to truly take in the beauty of America´s only rainforest.

Rialto Beach and Hole-in-the-Wall

While many people might think of the beach as a place to relax on the sand, the Pacific Coast of Washington is a perfect place to explore sea side cliffs and forests. The Rialto Beach and Hole-in-the-Wall offers a short 4 mile loop trail that is coastal hiking at its best. If you´re lucky, you might even find some tide pools filled with starfish and other unique sea creatures

Larch Lake

In the Central Cascades, Larch Lake trail offers one of the most secluded places you can get to in a day. This hike isn´t easy as you´ll gain over 2,500 feet of elevation in 12 round trip miles, but if you make it to the lake you´ll be greeted by one of the Cascades best kept secrets.

Hiking this trail in early fall is by far the best time as the azure glow of Larch Lake will contrast beautifully with the golden leaves of fall time.

A Must See: Spider Meadow

If you are in the Cascades Region, you will also want to check out Spider Meadow. A 13 mile round trip hike will take you through meadows and alpine highlands while giving you glimpse into the unique ecosystem of Glacier Peak Wilderness area.

Washington: So Much to See

Chances are that during your cross-state excursion throughout the state of Washington you´ll also come across dozens of other beautiful areas beckoning for you to stop and explore. You might not even be able to drive more than a couple miles without feeling the itch to see what´s over the hill. Exploring Washington State through these day hikes will offer you a glimpse into the natural beauty this state has to offer.