Best 4 Person Camping Tent Under $100 (in 2017)

Let me tell you a story. When my kids turned four and six respectively, I all of a sudden had a brilliant idea that we should organize our first family camping trip. Wanting to make sure that the experience would be a memorable one, and understanding that weather is always unpredictable, I headed down to the local outdoor sports shop, received an hour lecture by some employee there who claimed to be an expert on outdoor gear, and ended up spending $850 bucks on a family tent that was probably built to withstand base camp conditions on the slopes of Mount Everest.

My family, of course, was only heading to the local state park for a weekend trip. While the camping trip was a fun family outing, I eventually sent that tent into garage for storage where it didn´t get used again for another three years. Not the best $850 bucks I´ve spent in my life, to say the least.

Not everyone in the market for a tent necessarily needs a top quality product that promises to withstand hurricane-strength winds and blizzards that dump 4 feet of snow during the night. If you´re like me, a decent tent that will keep the rain out and the mosquitoes at bay while not putting a dent on the monthly budget is probably what you´re looking for. Below we offer a complete review on the absolute best four person tents for under $100 dollars.

Our Top Best 4 Person Camping Tent Under $100 in 2017:

ALPS Mountaineering Meramac Tent

ALPS Mountaineering Meramac

Priced at around $75, the ALPS Mountaineering Meramac Tent is a quality family tent that will your family dry and protected during those weekend camping adventures. The factory sealed fly and floor seams go a long way to help keep your tent dry during rainy nights and especially during those early mornings when heavy dew is an issue.

Furthermore, this tent comes with two doors and two windows. Nothing is worse than having your youngest daughter step all over you in the middle of the night as she makes her way to the tent door to head out to the bathroom. The double doors allow for easy entry and exit for everyone in the tent and actually increases the “roominess” feel of the tent.

Lastly, this tent comes with a gear loft, which will allow for easy storage for those dirty socks, backpacks, or food bags that otherwise would end up sharing the floor with you during the night. At only 11.25 pounds, this tent is also lightweight enough that you could carry it with you in your backpack if you´re looking to take the family on their first backpacking adventure.

NTK Cherokee GT Sport Camping Dome

NTK Cherokee GT 3 to 4 PersonAnother great family tent option that is priced well under $100 is the NTK Cherokee GT Sport Camping Dome. The 7 foot by 7-foot size is more than enough space to comfortably sleep a family of four, and could even sleep more if you have several young children. This tent is a great option if you live, or plan to camp, in places where rain is frequent and expected. The polyester with waterproof polyurethane 2500mm water column is built to withstand heavy rains and still keep you dry.

As far as structure goes, the 100% virgin NANO-FLEX fiberglass rods have an improved diameter, and are connected with inner elastic. These rods are built, then, to withstand some pretty high wind conditions so that you won´t have to wake up the family in the middle of the night in an effort to keep your tent from flying away.

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, the NTK Cherokee Tent has extended mesh ventilation all around the upper part of the tent. Cramming four (or more) people into any size tent can quickly lead to some muggy conditions, and the smell of wet socks in a small tent can quickly become unbearable unless you have a good ventilation system. This tent will keep you cool and comfortable while also keep your living and sleeping space free of those not so pleasant odors.

Coleman Longs Peak 6-Person Fast Pitch Dome Tent

Coleman-Longs-Peak

If you are looking for a four-person tent, why not opt for a tent that claims to easily house six people for the same price? The Coleman Longs Peak 6-Person Fast Pitch Dome Tent is a quality option for people looking for one of the largest and “roomiest” tents for a budget price. Coleman has long been recognized as a leading company providing affordable, yet high-quality outdoors equipment.

The dome style of the tent also allows for fast and easy setup. Even if you get into camp well after nightfall, you still should be able to get this tent set up quickly and efficiently. The fiberglass poles are heavy duty enough to withstand less than ideal weather conditions, and the 17-pound total weight of the tent makes it feasible to carry with you if you need to hike in to a campsite.

This tent also has needed ventilation on all four sides of the upper part of the tent. The removable rain fly is extremely waterproof, but will allow you to sleep without it on warm nights when you want to enjoy the view of the night sky.

CORE Equipment 6 Person Dome Tent

CORE 6 Person Dome TentThe CORE Equipment 6 Person Dome Tent is yet another quality tent designed for a maximum occupancy of six people. The eleven foot by nine foot interior space easily allows for two queen size air mattresses which means you won´t be fighting for space with your fellow campers. The gear loft that comes with this dome style tent is yet another added feature that will help to organize your interior space. The lantern hook means that you can keep the tent lighted at night and stay up late enjoy the family time together.

For those warm and sticky summer nights, this tent also comes with an adjustable air intake vent at the lower part of the tent. This will allow you to draw in the cooler air near the ground, which will circulate through the tent and up through the mesh ventilation at the top. The water repellant H20 Block fabrics, along with the taped seams will stand up well to those long rainy nights.

Lastly, this CORE Equipment Tent also comes with an electrical port access if you want to charge your phone or other electrical devices while sleeping. At only 16 pounds, this tent is also easily portable should you find yourself on the move.

FUNS 8 by 9 Feet One Touch Automatic Hexagon Pop Up Camping Gazebo

FUNS 8 by 9 ft One TouchImagine building up your family´s first camping trip to your kids for months. When the day finally arrives, your children look mockingly upon you and your spouse as you unsuccessfully try to put together a tent whose thousands of pieces appear more like a jigsaw puzzle than a camping tent.

The FUNS 8 by 9 Feet One Touch Automatic Hexagon Pop Up Camping Gazebo will solve this problem as it can be set up in minutes with simple one touch pop up technology. The quick setup process, however, doesn´t mean that you´ll be getting a cheap tent as this product comes with a combination of 190T water-and-dust proof polyester fabric and Ba Gauze. The a 3000mm PU waterproof coating around the entire tent offers maximum protection for those rainy nights as well.

The hexagon shape of this tent differs from your more traditional square or dome style tent, but once set up, you will find that the 8 foot by 9-foot size maximizes the amount of usable space on the inside. You can easily fit four full-sized adults in this tent and still have some space left over.

Camp Solutions Automatic Hydraulic Camping Tent

Camp-Solutions-Automatic-Hydraulic-Camping-TentsThe Camp Solutions Automatic Hydraulic Camping Tent is one of the most inexpensive of the products reviewed here, as you should be able to find this 3-4 person tent for only $50 dollars. Like the FUNS tent reviewed above, this tent is also extremely easy to set up as it comes with a hydraulic system for automatic opening and also easy storage. The double door design on this tent is also practical for large camping parties, as it will allow people to get in and out of the tent without having to step over one another.

This product is unique in it is essentially a one-piece tent. Instead of having to struggle with several strangely formed poles, you simply take this tent out of its carrying pouch, throw it into an open space and it will pop open. The circular carry bag that comes with tent also makes it easy to carry the tent during hikes or backcountry excursions.

The tent fabric is both water resistant and anti-UV so that you and your family can stay protected from both the sun and the rain while enjoying the Great Outdoors.

Allin Star Home Camping Tent

ALLIN-STAR-HOMEAnother great family camping tent option is offered by the company Allin. The Allin Star Home Camping Tent comes designed as a two person, four person, or six person. The four-person tent option comes in a dome style, which makes it both lightweight and relatively easy to set up. The continuous pole sleeves allow you to easily pass the 9.5 mm fiber poles through the sleeves during the assembly process.

Additionally, this unique tent comes with two-way zippers that allow for easy entry and exit from both inside and outside the tent. The adjustable venting system will keep you cool on warmer days and warm during fall or spring camping.

Lastly, this home camping tent weighs in at under ten pounds, which is quite remarkable when considering the thickness of the fabric that makes up the walls and floor of the tent.

SEMOO Water Resistant D-Style Family Dome Tent

SEMOO-Water-Resistant-D-Style-Family-DomeThe SEMOO Water Resistant D-Style Family Dome Tent is almost six feet high in the center of the cabin, which means that most adults will be able to comfortably stand up in the tent. The D-Style door is extremely large which makes it easy to get your air mattresses, large backpacks, coolers, and other large camping “furniture” that will keep your family comfortable and entertained while enjoying time together.

Furthermore, this SEMOO tent also comes with a hooped fly frame, which adds extra protection from the rain and other wind, almost like a mini-front porch. The shock-cord fiberglass poles are both lightweight and durable and make setup easy and efficient.

Along with the huge door, the two mesh windows make up over 50% of the surface area of the tent meaning that you will easily be able to get quality cross-ventilation to keep your home away from home smelling fresh and cool. The compact carry bag and the total weight of just over seven pounds make it easy to carry this tent with you almost anywhere you and your family are planning to hike.

Wnnideo Automatic Instant Pop Up Tent

Wnnideo-Automatic-Instant-Pop-Up-TentWith the Wnnideo Automatic Instant Pop up Tent, you´ll have a tent that looks like it belongs on the summit of some 14,000-foot peak in the Rocky Mountains while costing you well under $100.  What´s even better is that this tent sets itself up. The instant pop up technology allows you to set up this 4-5 person tent in under a minute, which is an important feature to have when you´re short on time or have a crammed agenda for the family trip to the Great Outdoors.

This hexagon-shaped tent has six mesh panels for maximum breathability while also incorporating a removable rain tarp that will protect you on rainy nights while also allowing you to enjoy the starry nights when the tarp isn´t needed.

The Best Tent for those on a Tight Budget

For people who aren´t regular campers, there´s probably no reason to splurge on a $1,000 dollar wonder tent that has so many unique features that you probably have no idea how to use. At the same time, staying warm, dry, and protected from the elements while out camping is something all of us want.

Instead of heading to the nearest Walmart to pick out the cheapest tent you can find, these nine 4-person (or more) tents offer fantastic functionality and performance while all costing under $100. For amateur campers who aren´t planning on hiking up Mount Kilimanjaro, any one of these tents will help assure an unforgettable camping trip.

7 Best Hunting Watches Reviewed (Rough & Tough)

If you are like me, it is pretty much impossible to keep track of time when out hunting. Besides the relaxing feel of being out in nature, I also typically get pretty involved in tracking animals, staying alert, and waiting for the perfect moment to bring home that long-awaited trophy prize. The only problem is that I usually do not become aware of the time until the sun is dipping below the horizon. When my family was expecting me home for lunch at midday, this usually causes some friction.

To avoid this problem, I have tried to bring my everyday work watch along with me, but after a brief rain storm, or getting muddied up by some dirt, those cheap watches eventually end up in the garbage. The best hunting watches on the market are not only stylish and designed for the hunter, but also offer quality durability that can withstand even the toughest hunting conditions. Read on for our complete review of the top hunting watches on the market today.

Best Watch For Hunting Comparison

Top Features Hunters Shoot For:

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The Warmest Socks for Hunting and Every Other Outdoor Activity

For many outdoor enthusiasts, as soon as the days begin to shorten and the trees lose their leaves as signs of the oncoming of winter, the amount of time they spend enjoying the Great Outdoors begins to decrease. Subsequently, “outdoors withdrawal syndrome” ensues. Though medical professionals have not identified this rare condition yet, I can tell you from personal experience that it certainly does exist. For people, like me, who love to be outside, the worst part of the year are the cold months of winter when the weather forces me to spend more time inside than I can stand. In an attempt to overcome my own outdoors withdrawal syndrome, I recently began an effort to find the absolutely best winter gear that would allow me to brave the elements and spend as much time as possible outdoors.

Overview of Best Thermal Socks Comparison:

After purchasing a subzero-sleeping bag, a tent built for Himalayan explorers, and a pair of winter boots that could withstand a trek across Antarctica, something was still missing to give me the feel of absolute protection from the cold. Finding a quality pair of thermal socks that can protect feet from the cold and the wetness of winter is an often overlooked, yet absolutely essential piece of gear for outdoors enthusiasts looking to spend time outdoors outside. Cold feet can ruin much more than a wedding, and for people wanting to stay comfortable outdoors in the cold, we have reviewed the best thermal socks on the market today.

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7 Amazing Rechargeable Battery Operated Heated Socks

I hate having cold feet. In fact, I’d say that suffering from cold feet is about as miserable as going to the dentist to get a root canal and not having the anesthesia kick in the way it should. The problem, unfortunately, is that I love to be outside, and where I live, for at least half the year, it’s cold, bitterly cold, the type of cold where your toes go numb before eventually turning that strange bluish purple color.

I tried purchasing virtually every type of wool sock on the market. While they certainly felt nice and comfortable inside, after a couple of hours of hiking through knee-deep snow, I was cursing the sheep whose wool must have been of inferior quality. I even considered learning how to sheer my own sheep, spin my own wool, and weave my own socks so that I could make a pair as thick a parka. Perhaps it’s due to poor circulation or the fact that I can stand to be indoors for more than a couple of hours, but the only part of being outdoors in the Fall and Winter that I can’t stand, is cold feet. Continue reading

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The Adventure of a Lifetime at Wyoming National Parks

When it comes to planning an epic vacation getaway, the first thing that pops into everyone´s mind are the most well-known national parks that get all of the attention. From Yellowstone to the Grand Tetons, to the Grand Canyon, it is pretty hard to go wrong with one of these places. What few people ever think about, however, are the other nearby attractions from state parks to national monument areas that also offer some pretty spectacular opportunities for adventure.

Imagine the following scenario: After having saved up for months, you finally are ready to take your family to Yellowstone National Park, a place you´ve dreamed of visiting for years. You´ve done your research, planned out everything you´re going to see, and made reservations at the best campgrounds.

Only a couple days into your supposed vacation of a lifetime, however, your oldest son begins to drag his feet. “Another hot spring today?” he asks sarcastically.

Shortly afterwards your youngest daughter refuses to put her boots on to go and watch the bison at Yellowstone Lake. Even your spouse begins to make not so subtle suggestions that it might be a good idea to check out something outside the boundaries of the park.

The problem, of course, is that you have absolutely no idea what other attractions the state of Wyoming has to offer. The Grand Tetons are at least half a day away, and for all you know, the rest of the state is nothing more than red rocks, wind turbines, and a rodeos.

Fortunately for you, we´ve done our research and have all the information on everything that the state of Wyoming has to offer. From the 2 most well-known national parks, to the 12 state parks, 5 national forests, 4 national wildlife refuges, and 2 national recreation areas, we´ve put together a guidebook on the best that Wyoming has to offer.

Below we´ll offer a succinct but thorough review of the two Wyoming National Parks while also giving you some other ideas about nearby attractions should to complement the wonder and natural beauty of both Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons.

Bison, Geysers, and Fishing at Yellowstone

Without a doubt, the main attraction for most travelers to the state of Wyoming is Yellowstone. While Yellowstone actually has land in three separate states, the vast majority of the national park and the main attractions are within Wyoming territory.

As one of the first national parks worldwide, and also one of the largest, there is definitely a lot to explore at Yellowstone. The unique geology of the area was formed by a massive volcanic eruption over half a million years ago. Today, Yellowstone is still brimming with geothermic activity, and one of the main attractions that people go to see are the dozens of geysers, hot springs, mud pots, and other unique geothermic formations that make you thankful for the thin crust of earth that separates us from our earth´s boiling innards.

The Geothermic Route

If you do make your way to Yellowstone, you absolutely cannot miss going to see Old Faithful. This massive geyser erupts regularly, and the park has set up grandstands where you will be able to catch the glimpse of a mini-volcano in action.

The Midway Geyser Basin is another spot you shouldn´t skip. Home to the world´s largest hot spring, the brilliant turquoise colors will remind you of a Caribbean beach, minus the hot sulfur-laden air, that is.

The Wildlife Route

Another major attraction at Yellowstone is the abundance of wildlife. From deer to grizzly bears to the majestic herds of bison, as soon as you step away from the crowds, you´re almost guaranteed to find some sort of wildlife that call the home park.

The massive herds of bison that used to roam freely over the Great Plains actually almost went extinct during the arrival of the frontiersmen to the western part of the United States. Today, however, they´re beginning to make a comeback and one of the best places to catch a glimpse of the bison is at Yellowstone.

Head out to the infamously named “Mud Volcano” on the Yellowstone River. Here you will be able to catch glimpses of bison warming themselves over the warm air escaping from a small geyser on the river´s edge. While slightly more strenuous, the Lava Creek Trail also offers a great chance to come upon a herd of wandering bison and even the solitary grizzly bear.

The Backcountry Route

The vast majority of tourists and vacationers who come to Yellowstone never actually see the vast stretches of wilderness and the backcountry. The park service has done a great job organizing a family friendly tourist circuit which, while worth seeing, doesn´t do justice to the rest of the marvels that the park offers.

If you are up to challenge, the Sky Rim Trail offers a unique perspective into the wilderness of Yellowstone. During the course of the 21 mile roundtrip trail, you´ll hike up to the almost 10,000 foot summit of Big Horn Peak while also enjoying panoramic vistas that might allow you to spot the distant Grand Tetons which we´ll explore in more detail below.

Once in the backcountry, Yellowstone National Park also offers dozens of opportunities for quality fishing. Finding your own Shangri-La spot to go angling on the Yellowstone River is about as close you can get to paradise.

If you really want to explore all of the many wonders that Yellowstone has to offer, check out our complete guide to Yellowstone National Park here.

40 Miles of Mountains at the Grand Tetons

There are few sights that will leave you with your jaw dropping to the ground like the massive 40-mile-long mountain front that makes up the main attraction of the Grand Tetons National Park. Along this postcard like view, eight peaks rise majestically over 12,000 feet in the air and their jagged, rocky surface not only resembles the mountains you drew in your first grade art class, but also will leave you mesmerized by both fear and admiration.

Located near the luxurious mountain town of Jackson Hole, one of the most unique aspects of the Grand Tetons is that you can go from a 5 star hotel or plush mountain lodge in Jackson Hole to camping on the jagged rocks of a forsaken wilderness in almost no time at all. From pristine mountain lakes, to quality hiking, to adrenaline pushing extreme sports, there is plenty to explore at the Grand Tetons.

The Relax Route

For many people, simply enjoying the view of the 40 mile front of jagged peaks is more than rewarding. One of the best sights in the entire park is found at Jenny Lake, an otherworldly beautiful mountain lake surrounded by the characteristic jagged peaks of the Tetons.

The 7.5 mile Jenny Lake Loop hike is definitely doable, and is mostly flat which makes this relatively easy trail the best way to get your nature fix while not scaling any of the towering mountains in the horizon. A day resting by this unique lake will get you all the relaxation you need.

The Adrenaline Route

With so many towering mountains and granite cliffs, of course the Grand Tetons would be a place for mountain climbing and rappelling junkies to flock to. If you like the thrill of hanging off the side of the mountain with nothing holding you from a certain death than a thin rope, then the Tetons are for you. There are dozens of places to go climbing and mountaineering, but you´ll need to check in with the visitor´s center to see which places are currently open to climbers.

The Solitary Route

Lastly, the Tetons also offer a great opportunity to camp out in the backcountry. You would be hard pressed to find a place with more spectacular night sky views than from the summit of the Grand Teton or any of the other massive, craggy peaks you can explore.

You will need a permit to explore the back country of the Tetons, and a bear canister is probably a good idea as well. But if you´re up for the challenge, there are few places on earth where you can feel more lost in the wildness of the natural world than at Grand Teton National Park. You can check out all of your backcountry options at the Grand Tetons here.

The Road Less Traveled: State Parks and Others in Wyoming 

Like we said at the beginning of this article, Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons certainly have a lot to offer. You could theoretically spend a month at each place and still not even scratch the surface of different things to do. But as human beings, our attention spans or short and our continued need for adventure and new horizons is always a temptation.

Fortunately, the great state of Wyoming has several beautiful state parks and other natural areas in close proximity to both of the Wyoming National Parks. A change of scenery never hurt anyone, and though not nearly as famous as the Yellowstone or the Tetons, the following state parks are definitely worth exploring.

Bear River State Park

Just outside of Salt Lake City, Bear River State Park offers a quick nature getaway for urban dwellers. After several days braving the backcountry of Yellowstone or the Grand Tetons, this park offers much more civilization. The paved and gravel trails are great for biking or rollerblading and you can even catch a glimpse of some bison and elk that roam the park.

Buffalo Bill State Park

Near the border with Montana, Buffalo Bill State Park is another great spot nearby Yellowstone where you can enjoy the mountain vistas of the Absaroka Mountains and some great fishing along the nearby reservoir. If you didn´t have much luck catching anything at Yellowstone Lake the Buffalo Bill Reservoir is a good second option.

Sinks Canyon State Park

This state park features a pristine mountain river named the Popo Agie. While the river is an attraction in itself, the real prize here is the mysterious “disappearance” of the river as it sinks into a large cavern only to miraculously reappear as a beautiful, crystal clear pool a half mile down the canyon. While you can´t fish at this pool, there aren´t many other places in the world for a more refreshing swim.

Bighorn National Forest

This beautiful area often gets overlooked because it is “only” a national forest. Nonetheless, the forest ecosystem here is incredible diverse with alpine meadows, towering mountains, and glacier carved valleys, and so much more. There are a couple of great campgrounds to stay at, and the area has several miles of quality hiking and backpacking trails.

Planning Your Escape to Wyoming 


There is no shortage of adventure in Wyoming. While many vacationers make the obligatory stops at Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons, there is so much more to see and explore. We hope that this brief guide peaks your interest to explore the endless wonders that Wyoming offers.

Complete Guide to Joshua Tree National Park

Welcome to our guide about Joshua Tree National park.  Just a quick note before we get started:

How complete is this guide?...

Like most national parks, this place is pretty big. In fact, you can likely write a book or two about it. ​  If you feel something is missing or needs to be updated, you are welcome to contact us and contribute

Introduction

When we think of national parks, the first image that comes to mind is that of pristine mountain lakes, towering mountain ranges, and roaring rivers where all sorts of wildlife find an abundant habitat. Very rarely do we consider an arid desert to be the representation of an unspoiled natural area.

Nonetheless, deserts are unique ecosystems that offer home and habitat to thousands of different types of flora and fauna. And despite their apparent harshness, many deserts around the world are actually fragile ecosystems that warrant protection and preservation.

The Joshua Tree National Park is one of the nation´s largest desert areas that is officially protected by the U.S. government. Spanning an area that is larger than the state of Rhode Island, this desert paradise offers a whole range of outdoors activities, from desert hiking to star gazing.

In this complete guide to the Joshua Tree National Park, we give you all the information you need to plan a one of a kind trip to one of our nation´s most unique ecosystems.

Joshua Tree National Park History

Joshua Tree National Park officially became a national park only a little over two decades ago. However, it has been a National Monument since the 1930´s. The park is named for the Joshua tree, Yucca Brevifolia in Latin, an inimitable desert tree that is appears to be a hybrid between a palm tree and a cactus. The abundance of these increasingly rare trees in the National Park may make you feel like you´re in the middle of a scenery painted by the famous children´s author Dr. Seuss.

Minerva Hoyt was one of the United States first female environmental activists and spent her life struggling to protect the desert areas of her native southern California. Despite her concerted efforts to protect the area now known as Joshua Tree National Park, over 250,000 acres of the park were given over to mining interests in the 1950´s.

However, when the park became a park in 1994 due to the signing of the Desert Protection Act by the U.S. Congress, most of those acres were reincorporated into the protected area of the park.

There are also several oases located throughout the parks where lush green vegetation contrasts sharply with the dryness of the surrounding landscape

Joshua Tree National Park Geography, Geology, Ecology and Botany

One of the most interesting and fascinating aspects of Joshua Tree National Park and desert ecosystems in general is their unique geology, ecology and botany. While most people are under the impression that deserts are harsh, cruel environments where few forms of life exist, deserts are actually teeming with different forms of life that have adapted over the course of millions of years to the specific climatic conditions.

Geography

From a Geographical standpoint, the national park is unique in that while all of the park is considered to be a desert, it is actually made up of two very distinct desert ecosystems. The Mojave Desert is higher and significantly cooler than the Colorado desert which is much lower. It is in this higher desert where the Joshua Tree best grows.

The eastern part of the park is where you will find the lower and hotter Colorado Desert. This desert ecosystem has much less Joshua trees and more typical desert type flora including desert scrub and cacti.

Geology

One of the most fascinating aspects of the Joshua Tree National Park are the unique rock formations that can be found around the park. Visitors often describe the rock strewn landscape as otherworldly with comparisons to Martian and Lunar landscapes common.

Geologists estimate that the unique rock formations scattered around the park were formed over 100 million years ago as molten lava boiled up to the earth´s surface and cooled just before the earth´s surface. This eventually formed a type of granite rock called monzogranite where a bizarre collection of rectangular joints, slow erosion, and ground water percolation eventually created these massive rock formations that continue to fuel our imagination.

Though it may be hard to imagine, the geology of the national park was also formed by flash floods and times of wetter climate when rain and rivers also contributed to the slow erosion of the rock faces.

Botany

While most travelers come to the park to see the oddly formed, Dr. Seuss-reminiscent Joshua Tree, there are dozens of other unique plant species that make up the botany of the park. Among the rock outcroppings, especially in the cooler Mojave Desert, you can find desert tree species such piñon pine, Juniper and a number of desert oak trees that are hard to find in almost any other part of the world.

The lower desert in the south and east parts of the park has large sand dunes, cacti and other scrub bush. Native California palm trees, called Fan Palms, occur throughout the park where oases form.

Hiking in Joshua Tree National Park

Without a doubt, one of the main attractions for nature lovers who come to Joshua Tree National park is the fairly large network of hiking trails. If you are worried about hiking into a desert for a multi-day trip, there are also a number of nature trails and short day hikes that will give you a unique insight into the desert reality.

What to Bring

Planning ahead and preparing all the necessary gear is very important. Most hikers tend to carry a lot of unnecessary things that they don't end up using. Be prepared and pack light. This post will surely help you do that: What is the Best Ultralight Backpack? We also made a pretty in-depth guide about hiking backpacks. As you plan for your hike, don't forget to check our article to help you choose the best backpack for your hiking needs.

Below we look at the top five trails in the park, three of which are longer hikes and two shorter hikes that pretty much anyone can handle.

Forty-Nine Palms Oasis

This three mile round trip hike is a good middle ground for people who want a little more desert exposure than what you can get on the nature trails, but aren´t quite ready to haul with them several gallons of water into the desert night.

This trail also will allow you to explore the oasis ecosystem where the contrast with the dry desert surroundings will make you feel as if you have found a Garden of Eden. The unique Californian Fan Palms surround the oasis where, especially during certain times of the year, you will even be able to find standing water. Imagine taking a swim in the middle of the desert!

The hike to the oasis is moderately strenuous, but you should be able to find abundant wildlife, especially a number of unique bird species that populate the oases in the park.

Lost Palms Oasis

Not all oases are the same, and the 7.2 mile hike to the Lost Palms Oasis is significantly different than the previous hike we reviewed. This hike starts at the Cottonwood Spring, which is an oasis in itself that is worth seeing. This spring has been used for hundreds of years, starting with the Cahuilla indigenous group that lived in the region prior to western settlement.

From the Cottonwood spring, a fairly easy hike through the desert will take you to a spectacular overlook of the Lost Palms Oasis. From there, you can choose to wander into the oasis which is actually situated within a canyon.

For more adventurous hikers, some boulder scrambling can be found nearby at Victory Palms and Munsen Canyon. This hike can take anywhere between 4-6 hours (and more if you decide to explore other nearby areas) so be sure to bring plenty of water and sunscreen with you. If you have some simple purification equipment, you can refill your water supply at the oasis.

Be on the lookout for bobcats and mountain lions as several visitors have claimed that the Lost Palms Oasis is a prime spot for spotting these hard to find cats.

Boy Scout Trail

If you are wanting a true desert adventure that can be turned into an overnight experience, the Boy Scout Trail is the hike for you. At just over 16 miles round trip, this hike isn´t for novices, and you will have to carry with you a fair amount of water.

This unique trail passes through the Wonderland of Rocks, which offers seemingly endless vistas of the unique, otherworldly rock formations that dot the park. This trail is also shared by horseback riders, so if a member of your family isn´t keen on hiking through the desert on their own two legs, you should be able to rent a horse for the day as well.

Spending the night under the desert sky is an experience that should not be missed, and the Boy Scout Trail is perhaps the best place in the park for an overnight trip. Any number of rock outcroppings along the trail offers a quality desert shelter. Make sure to check out the Backcountry Board once you get to the park to find information on overnight use for this trail.

Hidden Valley Nature Walk

For less avid hikers who still want to get the desert experience, the Hidden Valley Nature Walk is a great alternative. Much shorter than the previous three trails, this one mile loop trail will take you among massive boulders and offers vistas of a number of desert panoramas.

Because this valley is situated in between the two desert ecosystems, visitors to this trail will be able to observe pretty much every type of tree that grows in the park. From the infamous Joshua trees, to piñon pine, Juniper, desert oak trees, cacti and scrub brush, this trail will give you the full park experience in only one mile of hike.

The large rock formations are also a popular destination for mountain climbers and you´re bound to find a number of climbers hanging perilously from the sides of rock faces. This makes for an interesting side attraction. A nearby campground is also available year round.

Ryan Mountain

If you are looking for the best place to enjoy spectacular desert panoramic views and sunsets, look no further than Ryan Mountain. At 5,456 feet, Ryan Mountain towers over the rest of the landscape. The relative lack of vegetation on top of the mountain allows for spectacular vistas of the surrounding desert.

While the hike to the top is only a mile and a half long you will be ascending over 1,000 feet, making it a moderately strenuous hike. The views of the Pinto Basin and the Lost Horse Valley are well worth the climb, and the sunsets from the summit turn the surrounding desert landscape into a blaze of intense colors.

Climbing in Joshua Tree National Park

While the hiking trails throughout the park are undoubtedly one of the main attractions in the park, there are also a number of high adrenaline climbing activities. Since none of the rock formations are very tall (most of them are actually under 200 feet in height), the climbs aren´t very long.

There are, however, varying degrees of difficulty, and you can design your own climbing circuit throughout the park. There are over 400 different objects to be scaled in the park, and thousands of potential routes.

If climbing isn´t your thing, you can also find places around the park for bouldering. Below we look at three of the best places to get the adrenaline flowing on the rocks. All three of these climbs are easily accessible from Quail Springs.

Trashcan Rock

While the name doesn´t sound classy, this popular crag has a number of different routes for all levels of expertise. The more commonly climbed west face is great for beginners, and can be mastered with even the minimum of training and experience. The eastern face of the rock, however, presents significant challenges.

One thing to keep in mind is that there are not permanent anchors at Trashcan Rock so you will need to bring along your gear anchors. Also, if you´re looking for a bit of solitude on your climb, don´t come during the weekend when the rock is almost always filled with amateur climbers.

Hound Rocks

This rock face is actually composed of two separate rocks with a narrow canyon in between. History tells us that it used to be the site of a long since abandoned mining camp. To get to Hound Rocks, you´ll need to drive to the Quail Springs parking lot, and then follow a simple path over some sand dunes.

The two best routes on this climb are named the “right Baskerville Crack” and “Tossed Green.” Both of these receive a good amount of sun early in the morning. If you´re looking to stay cool during your climb consider adding this climb to your route during the afternoon hours.

White Cliffs of Dover

If you are looking for a place to prepare for a bigger climb, say at Yosemite National Park, then the White Cliffs of Dover offer a quality training grounds. The White Cliffs of Dover have a number of features that are pretty similar to the legendary granite rock faces at Yosemite.

The cracks and corners on the climb will prepare you for what you´ll find if you are preparing for Half Dome or El Capitan in Yosemite. Furthermore, this is one of the only areas in the park where you´ll find smooth, fine grained granite. Most of the other rocks don´t have the smoothness because of the desert climate.

Other Things to Do in Joshua Tree National Park

While mountain biking or hiking, there are also a number of other great activities that you can incorporate into your planned trip to Joshua Tree National Park. The unique desert ecosystem offers a number of unique opportunities for activities such as birding, mountain biking, and four wheel driving. For people who live in cities or other urban places with massive amounts of light pollutions, the desert nights and the dark sky also make amateur astronomy a great enjoyment for the whole family.

Birding

For bird watchers, the idea of finding a plethora of species in the desert might sound counterintuitive. From experience, most birders know that the majority of bird species flock to places where there is an abundance of water and tree habitat, no exactly what you would expect to find in the desert. Nonetheless, Joshua Tree National Park is home to over 250 species of birds, many of them rare species who only live in harsh desert climates.

The several oases around the park provide needed refuge and habitat for several species of birds who find themselves “trapped” by desert on every side. In many ways, the relatively small spaces of oases make birdwatching almost too easy, as you´ll likely see dozens of different species during any visit.

If you are looking for some of the rarer desert species such as greater road runner, the cactus wren, or several different types of mockingbirds, they are also quite prevalent throughout the different areas of the park. Some of the rarest species that birders come to look for include the ladder backed woodpecker and the oak titmouse.

Since most of the bird species can be found most easily around an oasis, you can combine a hike to one of the oases, with a planned overnight backcountry trip where you will be able to search for birds during the evenings and early mornings.

Astronomy

For many folks who come from the city, one of the most awe inspiring sights in Joshua Tree National Park doesn’t have to do with anything that is actually in the park, but what is above it during the night. While most of southern California is infamously renowned for its massive amounts of light pollution and smog that essentially block out the lights from the stars. Joshua Tree National Park is far enough away from the urban area to escape these phenomena.

Furthermore, the desert night usually produces clear skies with very few clouds and very little humidity or other forms of interference. For these reasons, the park is also a favorite for astronomers and star gazers.

According to the Bortle Dark Sky scale, the park has a dark sky rating of 3-4, which is significantly darker than most other places around the country. Be sure to bring a pair of binoculars and some simple sky maps to help you navigate the constellations. If you can plan your trip around a known meteor shower, you´ll find it difficult to sleep while watching hundreds of falling starts rip across the massive sky above you.

Mountain Biking and Four Wheel Driving

Joshua Tree National Park is also a great spot for people looking for a mountain biking or four wheel driving adventure. While there are several paved roads throughout the park, there are much more relatively solitary backcountry roads that the park allows 4 wheel drive vehicles to enter. Make sure you stay on the road, whether you´re on a bike or in a truck since tracks in the desert can last for years and disrupt the vulnerable desert ecosystems.

Below we look at three backcountry roads that are great for either a mountain biking trip or a four wheel drive experience.

Pinkham Canyon Road

This twenty mile road is a challenge for mountain bikers. It takes you deep into a canyon and then through flood plains. The soft sand might be a challenge to pull your bike or car through, so come prepared for some tough terrain.

Geology Tour Road

This backcountry trip is an adventure and a geology lesson all wrapped into one. The roughly 18 mile round trip has 16 stops along the way to help novices understand the subtle differences in the fascinating rock formations that you´ll be seeing. Make sure to bring along an informative brochure that explains each of the 16 stops so you´ll know what you´re witnessing in geological terms.

Black Eagle Mine Road

For a different route consider the Black Eagle Mine Road. This route will take you through the Eagle mountains, through several different dry washes, and along the Pinto basin. After nine miles or so you will leave the park, but the road continues where you´ll find remnants of several old, abandoned mines.

Best Time of Year to Visit Joshua Tree National Park

The best time of year to visit the park really depends on what you are looking for and wanting to do. For hikers, one of the main attractions is finding wildflowers bloom in the desert, a unique experience in itself. In order to see the flowers, however, you will have to plan a trip in the late fall.

If you want to avoid the crowds, the winter months are the best though the desert can get cold and even experience snowfall at the higher elevations. For milder temperatures to avoid heat exhaustion while exploring the desert, your best bet is to visit during the early spring. No matter when you come, however, Joshua Tree National Park always has something to offer.

Few Reminders

Just a quick tip from a reader, you should book a campsite months in advance. Even during the week, during peak season. Planning ahead is very important to make sure your adventure will be successful. Prepare all the necessary gear in advance.

What should you bring? 

For campers, bring a quality tent to get you through any weather. We have compiled all the top tent brands available on the market today and reviewed them to help you choose. It's also a cool idea to bring a cooler to keep your food fresh and your beverages cool. There are a lot of great coolers for camping that can keep ice for a few days, even for a week! Make sure to check out these guides as you plan for your Joshua Tree adventure.

Be over-prepared for “what if” situations. If you twist an ankle off trail and your one-day hike suddenly turns into a two-day hike, will you have enough food and water to sustain yourself?


Solo Off Trail Hiking

The risks that come with off trail hiking automatically increase if you are hiking off trail alone. The intimacy with nature that comes with solo hiking is understandable, and while many can advise you against hiking off trail alone, the decision is ultimately yours.

  • Leave an itinerary with someone back home including the date and time you expect to get back.

  • Consider investing in a GPS device, but don’t rely too heavily on it.

  • Always have a map and compass for guidance.

  • Check in with park rangers along the way.

The biggest dangers that come with off trail hiking are getting lost and getting injured, but with enough preparation, it is possible to successfully execute an off trail hike.

Conclusion

Without a doubt, Joshua Tree National Park offers a unique desert geography, otherworldly geological rock formation, spectacular hiking trails, high adrenaline climbing and mountain biking paths, and so much more. For a truly authentic desert experience, look no further than Joshua Tree National Park.

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The Top 5 Spots for Fishing in National Parks

A warm sunny day; the perfect shady spot underneath a large weeping willow with roots deeply dug into the sides of a crystalline river brimming with rainbow trout whose quick, darting movements make the river literally shimmer with life; snow-capped mountains in the horizon whose snow melt is bringing life to the river where you now sit peacefully in a comfortable chair with your line baited and waiting in the river in front of you: for many people this is the essence of joy and bliss.

Fishing is perhaps one of the most relaxing sporting activities out there. Our nation´s national parks are easily some of the most beautiful, pristine natural areas our world has to offer. When you combine the two, you´re in for an experience you won´t soon forget. Below we look at the top five spots to fish in our extensive and diversified national park system.

Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park, Montana

There is something truly stunning at the site of crystal clear mountain lakes with jagged, perpetually snow-capped mountains rising literally right off of the lake´s shore. Lake McDonald at Glacier National Park is just one of the impressive lakes that this beautiful park offers. While the scenery would be enough of a consolation prize, the fishing is excellent as well. Fishers from all over the country come here to try and catch the infamous bull trout which has some of the best coloring of any trout in the world.

Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Imagine standing knee deep in a cool mountain river while casting your fly fishing rod. A couple hundred feet upstream a herd of wild bison cross the river. Warm gasses from a nearby geyser escape from the riverbank coating the entire river in a mystical fog. This is the essence of fishing at Yellowstone. Many people come to try and catch the native Yellowstone Cutthroats, an absolutely beautiful fish and complicated catch.

Low Water Canals, Everglades National Park, Florida

Florida's Snook flickr/myfwcmedia

One third of this national park is covered by water, meaning that there is no lack of fishing opportunities. The peacock bass, snook, and redfish are some of the most prized fish in these waters, though you can find dozens of other species. One of the best places for fishing are any of the dozens of canals during low water times. The Interceptor Canals is a particularly beautiful area to spend the day fishing.

Crane Lake, Voyagers National Park, Minnesota

There is no shortage of water at Voyagers National Park in northern Minnesota, and fish are also in abundance. Crane Lake, especially where the Vermillion River enters the lake, is perhaps one of the best spots at the park to catch walleye, northern pike, bass, muskie or panfish. You could also take a several day (or week) canoe or kayak trip throughout the interconnected lake system to explore the beauty of the park.

Mount Desert Island, Acadia National Park, Maine

One of the best parts of fishing at Acadia is that you can do both freshwater and saltwater fishing in the same day. There are hundreds of miles of rivers and streams running through the national park that are teeming with yellow perch and largemouth bass. The shoreline offers several coves that will let you try your luck at catching land stripers and blue fish while enjoying the impressive views of the iconic rocky coasts of Maine. Of all the quality fishing spots at this national park, you might want to check out Mount Desert Island which has great freshwater lakes while also offering nearby coves for ocean fishing as well.

The Beauty of Fishing the National Parks

Unlike the small creek running behind your home, you will most likely be looking at a hefty fine if you don´t take the time to get the proper licenses to be able to fish in our nation´s national parks. Since these areas are actively protected by rangers and other environmental agencies, it is essential that you stop in at the nearest visitor´s center to learn the requisites regarding fishing in the national parks. Fortunately, most of the national parks make it rather easy to get a simple fishing license which will allow you to truly enjoy a magical experience in the lakes, rivers, and coas

The Top 7 Camping Spots at Olympic National Park

From beautiful beaches, to old growth rainforests, to dramatic snow-capped mountains, you would be hard pressed to find a national park with more diverse ecosystems than Olympic National Park in the northwestern corner of Washington State. With such varied landscapes, it can be difficult to decide which part of the park to visit and where to set up camp. Below we offer our advice on the top seven campgrounds that Olympic National Park offers.

Deer Park

This campground isn´t for the light of heart. It is easily the highest campground in the park, and on clear nights you´ll enjoy star-filled skies and perhaps even a glimpse of the lights from distant Seattle. You can also enjoy the stunning views of the nearby peaks of the Olympic Mountains. There are absolutely no services at this campground and you will have to hike in, but if you make it and don´t mind roughing it, there are some absolutely spectacular views and great nearby hikes where you´ll be sure to find plenty of company with the mountain goats.

Fairholme Campground

Fairholme Campground is much more family friendly than Deer Park and does offer basic amenities such as restrooms and running water. It is located next the Lake Crescent and you and your family will be conveniently located next to several hiking trails, waterfalls, and short summits you can hike up. This campground fills up quickly so you will want to plan to get there early in the day to secure your spot.

Graves Creek Campground

What isn´t to like about camping in a rainforest? The Quinault Rainforest is an absolute beautiful area ripe with towering, moss-covered trees that seem to swallow you up in your smallness. The Graves Creek Campground has plenty of great camping spots, but if you are lucky you might even be able to find a spot right on the banks of the Quinault River where you´ll fall asleep to the tranquil sound of a crystal clear river running through a rainforest.

Hoh River Campground

The Hoh Rainforest is easily the most famous rainforest ecosystem in the United States. The Hoh Rainforest Trail offers perhaps the best glimpse into this truly unique ecosystem. The campground here is rather simple, but each and every spot seems to be swallowed up by the towering trees and thick vegetation.

It is important to remember that this is one of the wettest spots in the United States so you will want to bring a quality water proof tent and several ground tarps to stay dry. To help you choose a quality tent, check out our post that features the best tent brands available today. 

Kalaloch Campground

What could be better than finding a campsite that offers stunning views of sunsets over the Pacific Ocean? The Kalaloch Campground is located on a high bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean on the western most part of the National Park. After a long day of exploring the tide pools and the infinite variety of marine life and enjoying the great beach hiking near the campground, the sunsets are the best way to end your day.

Plan Ahead 

This campground does fill up during the summer months so you might want to make a reservation. Know the appropriate gear for the right season. If you plan to visit during the summer months, it's best to bring a durable cooler to keep your drinks cool and food fresh. Check out our review of the best camping cooler to help you choose which cooler to bring.

If you visit during the off season, however, you will find the place almost empty and have your choice of the best sites available.

Mora Campground

While this campground isn´t located within sight of the coast, you are only a short walk away from those magnificent sea stacks located along the Olympic Coast. This campground definitely is less crowded than the Kalaloch Campground, and it is also the closest campground to the LaPush coast. If you´re lucky, you might even be able to spot a whale off shore. Bald eagles and deer are also common sightings around this campground.

North Fork Campground

Perhaps the most under-appreciated of Olympic National Park´s campgrounds, the North Fork Campground along the Quinault River is a gem that very few people ever visit. While you can simply come to this campground to enjoy the solitude and hike along the river´s edges, you are also conveniently close to some great trail such as First Divide and the Skyline Primitive Trail.

Finding the Perfect Spot at Olympic National Park

Whether you hike up to the highest reaches of Deer Park or stay near the ground at Kalaloch, Olympic National Park offers several beautiful and unique campgrounds that will offer you a unique glimpse into this truly magical national park. Since most of the campgrounds don´t take reservations, you will want to make sure to plan ahead. The earlier you get to the campground, the better chance you will have to find that perfect spot for a few days of rest, relaxation and adventure.


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Wanna see more about Olympic National Park? Check out our latest and Complete Guide to this wonderful park. ​

Complete Guide to Olympic National Park

How Complete is This Guide?

The answer? Not very complete. Olympic National Park constitutes a huge expanse of land and while we have done our best to explain the very best to get the most out of your time at the park, there are always new adventures to be found. From off the beaten path backpacking trips, to hidden waterfalls that no one knows about, part of the wonder of exploring our national parks is finding places and treasures that are uniquely your own.​ If you feel something is missing or needs to be updated, you are welcome to contact us and contribute.

Introduction

Located in the top right hand corner of the United States is one of the most beautiful, enchanting, and awe-inspiring places in the entire world. Olympic National Park borrows its name from Olympus, the mythical mountain top in Greek Mythology which as the abode of the gods. After spending a few days exploring the over 140,000 square miles that make up this truly unique region, you´ll understand why it got its name.

From whale sightings to glaciers, rugged coastlines to alpine tundra, this park is one of the most varied and diverse places in the world; not to mention that you will also be able to enjoy old growth temperate rainforest. What other place in the world can you be at the beach one minute, in the middle of a rainforest the next minute, and climbing up a glacier packed alpine mountain the next?

In this complete review of Olympic National Park, we will let you know why this unique national park is so special. We will begin by looking as the natural history of the park before exploring the unique ecology of Olympic National Park. For nature buffs, we´ll also explain how this park is also involved in a world renowned ecological restoration project. Finally, we offer advice on the top activities at Olympic National Park so that you can get the most out of your time at the park.

Rainforests and Glaciers: the Unique Ecology of Olympic

For thousands of years, indigenous population have made the area that today comprises Olympic National Park their home. While early research believed that most indigenous people mostly lived along the coastline, today archaeological evidence supports the theory that indigenous populations also had significant presence in the higher regions, especially in the sub-alpine meadows which were most likely used for hunting and fishing.

Today, two indigenous groups continue to live in the region. The Hoh People live along the Hoh River while the Quileute people live along the coast at the mouth of the river of the same name.

The small peninsula in northwestern Washington where Olympic National Park is located is unique in that three very distinct ecosystems exist in a much reduced area of land. The coastal strip of the park runs about 60 miles from north to west, but is only a few miles wide at most. Instead of white sand beaches that many people picture when they think of the ocean, the coasts at the park are filled with huge boulders, thick vegetation, and mystical sea stacks which are large, pillar like rocks that rise out of the ocean.

The constant fogs and mists associated with the rainforest ecosystem nearby create habitat for all sorts of unique marine animals including seals and sea lions. Tidal pools are a great place to find starfish and all other sorts of ocean creatures.

In the middle of the park you can find the mighty Olympic Mountains which rise sharply from the coast to close to 8,000 feet. While there are certainly higher mountains throughout the United States, the fact that these mountains literally rise out of the sea gives them a commandeering presence.

On top of the mountains are several ancient glaciers, the largest of which is the Hoh Glacier which runs for more than 3 miles in length. Mount Olympus is the tallest peak in the range rising to over 7,900 feet. This almost perpetually snow-capped peak offers a beautiful contrast to the surrounding greenness of the old growth forest.

Finally, on the western edge of the park sits the Hoh Rainforest. A magical, temperate climate rainforest that receives over 150 inches of rain each year making this easily the wettest area in the entire continental United States. The Hoh Rainforest is dominated by several unique coniferous trees such as firs, cedars, and spruce. A variety of mosses and air plants hang from the branches of virtually every tree.

The fact that the park is located on an isolated peninsula with a massive mountain range separating a coastal ecosystem and a rainforest makes for an exclusive ecology. Within the park you can find exceptional wildlife, such as the Roosevelt Elk, that are hard to find anywhere else in the country. Black bears, deer, and even cougars have large numbers within the park as well.

The Elwha Ecosystem Restoration Project

For many indigenous peoples around the Pacific Northwest, the Salmon were an important source of food and a vital part of their spirituality. With the arrival of western peoples and industrial development, however, hundreds of rivers were dammed up for hydroelectricity and other uses, essentially blocking the path of large populations of salmon who used to “run” from the ocean, upstream to their spawning grounds.

The Elwha Ecosystem Restoration Project at Olympic National Park is an ambitious restoration project being undertaken by the park service. Essentially, they are removing over 300 feet of dams and draining the artificial reservoirs in order to allow the Pacific Salmon to once again gain access to the upper portions of the rivers that they haven´t had access to in almost 100 years. For people who are interested in ecological restoration, this project is one you will want to visit and study.

Some Unique Facts and Figures about Olympic National Park

· The United Nations has proclaimed Olympic National Park to be both a World Heritage Site and an International Biosphere Reserve

· Close to 3 million people visit the park each year making it the 7th most visited park in the country

· Olympic National Park has 60 ancient glaciers covering the peaks of the Olympic Mountain Range

· Over 600 miles of trails criss cross the entire park

· The Hoh Rainforest receives over 150 inches of rain each year while many areas on the eastern edge of the park only receive 16 inches of rain

· President Franklin Roosevelt created Olympic National Park in 1938

· Over 95% of the park is designated wilderness area

· 30 million years ago, Olympic National Park was actually under the sea

· Crescent Trout is a species of trout that can only be found within the park boundaries

Day Hikes at Olympic National Park

Without a doubt, the best way to enjoy and explore Olympic National Park is through getting out of your car and into the wilderness. From coastal hikes to trekking up alpine glaciers, to meandering through deep rainforests, the 600 miles of trails that weave through the park will allow you to explore three distinct and magical ecosystems. Below are our recommendations for the absolute best day hikes at Olympic National Park

Ozette Loop Trail

This nine mile trail is by far the best way to explore the rugged coastline of Olympic National Park. From the beginning point at Ozette Lake, the trail first takes you through thick swamplands populated by old growth cedar forests. Once you emerge from the forest, you will walk along the coastline for over three miles enjoying stunning views of sea stacks and rocky beaches. If you want to do this hike, however, you will have to register at the visitor´s center as access to this area is sometimes controlled by park authorities.

Sunrise Ridge

If you are looking for a place to find hordes of wildflowers, a short five mile hike to Sunrise Ridge will take you into subalpine meadows where you can find dozens of types of flowers. Make sure to visit between July and August to best enjoy the bloom season.

Grand Valley

This close to ten mile loop will take you deep into the Olympic wilderness, showcasing wildflowers, mountain lakes, and some truly otherworldly views. If you are in decent shape you can still do this as a day hike, though it can also be extended into an overnighter if you get the right permits.

Sol Duc Falls

This short trail (ranging from 1.5 to 5.2 miles depending on the actual route you take) is a classic Olympic experience. You´ll meander through old growth forest before emerging at a beautiful waterfall. Nearby you can also find the Sol Duc hot springs which is a great way to relax after a long day on the trail.

Mount Elinor

This is one of the easier peaks to climb in the Olympic Range, but it also offers some fantastic views of both the ocean at Puget Sound and the park´s craggy, snow-capped interior. At only 6.2 miles round trip, it makes for a great day hike.

Overnight Backpacking Trips at Olympic National Park

For hikers who aren´t content with a simple day excursion into the Olympic wilderness, you can get a backcountry permit from park authorities to explore more in depth the beauty of Olympic National Park. To apply for your backcountry permit you will need to do so with plenty of time in advance as much many permits run on a quota basis that is first come, first serve.

South Coast Wilderness Trail

For people who want to see the best of the Olympic National Park coastline, this trail is the one for you. The 17 mile stretch from Third Beach to Oil City Traverse might not sound like a lot of miles, but the going will definitely be tough as you will be scrambling over boulders, fording creeks, climbing up muddy headland trails to wait for tides to go down. However, if you are up for the challenge, you´ll be in for a treat as the trail offers virtually unlimited amounts of quality campsites where you´ll be able to enjoy epic sunsets and unique views of all sorts of wildlife.

North Fork Quinault River Trail

This 21-mile loop following the Quinault River for much of the way and is perhaps the best way to spot unique wildlife on the trail. Both mountain goats, black bear, and the hard to spot Roosevelt Elk can be seen.

Enchanted Valley

The name alone should be enough enticement to get you out into the backwoods. The 26 roundtrip miles of this backpacking adventure will give you the full Olympic experience as you will be trekking through old growth rainforests, passing by (and through) numerous pristine mountain rivers and streams, and enjoying otherworldly panoramic views of glacier-capped peaks and powerful waterfalls.

Winter Sports Activities at Olympic

What could be better than heading from the beach to snow in the span of a few hours? While the coastal regions of the park almost never receive any sort of snow, the mountainous regions have thick snow cover for much of the winter months.

Hurricane Ridge is by far the best place to head if you are into skiing or snowboarding. The Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area is a non-profit ski resort operated by the park. Relatively cheap lift tickets will allow you to head up and down the mountain on one of the two tow ropes and the one poma lift. Plan accordingly since the road to Hurricane Ridge is usually only operable from Friday to Sunday during winter months.

The Best Campgrounds at Olympic National Park

Nothing is quite as enchanting as camping out under the stars while visiting Olympic National Park. If backpacking isn’t your thing, there are still several unique campgrounds located around the park that combine proximity to the natural world with some basic conveniences for families. Below are our top three recommendations for the top campgrounds at the park.

Deer Park Campground

This is high-alpine camping at its absolute best. After a grueling 18 mile drive up winding mountain roads (RV´s aren´t allowed because of this) you will find a gorgeous, small camp ground that offers stunning 360 degree views of the surrounding mountains to one side and the ocean to the other side. After enjoying the sunset, you´ll want to keep your eyes to the sky as the stars come out in breathtaking fashion. There are only 14 sites available at a first come, first serve basis so make sure to head up the mountain early in the day if you want a spot.

Graves Creek Campground

Who wouldn´t want to camp in a rainforest? Graves Creek Campground is located next to the Quinault River within the section of the Quinault Rainforest. This campground is strategically placed so that campers have relatively easy access to popular hiking trails throughout the park including the Enchanted Valley and Pony Bridge.

Heart o´the Hills Campground

If you are looking for a family friendly campground, the Heart o´the Hills Campground offers fantastic ranger programs for kids and is also very accessible. Furthermore, you will only be a short 14 mile drive from Hurricane Ridge which offers fantastic views and a place to view some epic sunsets.

Other Activities to Fill Your Days at Olympic National Park

If hiking isn´t your thing, or if your kids are complaining that they don´t want to walk through the woods anymore, there are several other recreational options at Olympic National Park which we will explore below.

Both the Elwha and Hoh Rivers offer spectacular rafting trips. While the rapids might not be as quick as other spots throughout the United States, the scenery alone makes up for it as you will most likely spot wildlife and enjoy the rainforest that comes right up to the edge of the river. Several outfitting companies offer different length rafting tours.

For folks looking for more of an adrenaline rushing, alpine climbing is also available throughout the park. While the loose shale rock that makes up much of the Olympics is not quite as sturdy as solid granite, several mountaineers make their way to the park to climb up Mount Olympus, Mount Deception, Mount Constance, and other sheer cliffs located throughout the park.

After several hard days of hiking, nothing is quite as relaxing as finding a perfect spot next to an alpine lake or pristine mountain stream to fish for the day. Olympic National Park has over 600 lakes, 4,000 miles of rivers and streams, and 60 miles of coastline. With water virtually everywhere, you can easily find that perfect spot to fish for the day. You can check out the requirements to get your fishing license at the National Park Website here.

Finally, Olympic National Park also offers a number of hot springs which is a great way to enjoy the park. Olympic Hot Springs can be found along the Boulder Creek Trail and the Mineral Hot Springs, which are a little bit more accessible, can be enjoyed at the Sol Duc Hot Spring Resort. Either one of these options makes for a great way to end your memorable trip to Olympic National Park.

When to Visit Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park is open year round, though the vast majority of people head to the park during the dry summer months between June and September. If you are worried about the rain ruining your vacation (and there is a lot of it) this might be the best time to visit. If, however, you want to avoid the crowds, you plan your trip early in the spring where the heavy snow runoff brings alive the thousands of miles of creeks and streams running through the park.

If you like winter adventure sports such as skiing, snowboarding, or snowshoeing, you can also plan to visit the park during the winter months. While some of the roads will be closed, snowshoeing trails are open year round and will offer you a truly unique view into this special place.

Conclusion

If you have never visited the Pacific Northwest, Olympic National Park should definitely be in your itinerary. Even if you live in Seattle or Portland, the massive size of the Olympic wilderness means that there will always be new places to explore. From rugged coastlines, to glacier topped mountains, to thick, enchanting old growth rainforests, Olympic National Park is a place that is beckoning you to come and explore.

For people who want to see the best of the Olympic National Park coastline, this trail is the one for you. The 17 mile stretch from Third Beach to Oil City Traverse might not sound like a lot of miles, but the going will definitely be tough as you will be scrambling over boulders, fording creeks, climbing up muddy headland trails to wait for tides to go down. However, if you are up for the challenge, you´ll be in for a treat as the trail offers virtually unlimited amounts of quality campsites where you´ll be able to enjoy epic sunsets and unique views of all sorts of wildlife.

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Complete Guide to Biscayne National Park

How Complete Is This Guide?

The answer? Not very complete. While Biscayne National Park is one of the smaller national parks in the country, there are always nooks and crannies that are yet to be explored that we may have left out. That is one of the greatest parts of exploring the national parks of our country: finding a hidden wonder that no one seems to know about.​ If you feel something is missing or needs to be updated, you are welcome to contact us and contribute.

Introduction

South Florida isn´t exactly known as a place of wilderness where one can go to get away from civilization and relax in the wonders of the natural world. Rather, South Florida is usually considered as a hopping place with great beaches, even better night life, and a cosmopolitan, Caribbean, urban feel.

However, as with most places in our world, it usually doesn´t take much to escape from the noise and clatter of civilization and find places that offer respite to the soul and mind. Just south of Miami, Biscayne National Park can be found. While 95% of this park is under water, you would be hard pressed to find a place more different than the bustling and hurried environment of downtown Miami.

Whether you live in downtown Miami and are looking for a place to get away from the rat race of urban life or are wanting to plan a tropical vacation to a truly unique ecosystem, Biscayne National Park is a place unlike any other. In this complete guide to Biscayne National Park, we will look at the history and ecology of Biscayne National Park, offer a few obscure and hard-to-believe facts and figures, and then go on to give you the lowdown on all the activities that Biscayne National Park has to offer so that you can plan out a truly unforgettable trip to one of the most unknown national parks in the United States.

The Storied History of Biscayne National Park

The coral reefs, turquoise waters, and pristine beaches of Biscayne National Park might be the principal attractions of this unique place. However, the history of the reef and the island itself is a great attraction for history buffs and people who want a look into the how life and civilization has evolved together.

The Glades indigenous culture inhabited the island of what is today the park around 10,000 years ago, but due to rising sea water (sound familiar?) they were forced to abandon the islands in search of higher elevations. The Tequesta people were the next indigenous habitants that returned to the islands once waters receded and lived in the region until the Spanish conquistadors forcefully took over the islands in the 16ht century.

The large coral reef ecosystem is certainly an attraction to divers and snorkelers (as we´ll see below) but for Spanish ship captains, these reefs caused several shipwrecks leaving all sorts of unique underwater treasures to explore.

In the early 1900´s, wealthy millionaires from Florida and other places around the United States made the Biscayne islands into their private getaways. Stiltsville was an actual community that sprung up on the islands in the 1930´s. While the rest of the country was dealing with the Great Depression, this remote island of luxury and excess was a haven for high rolling gamblers and millionaire parties. During Prohibition, the remote location of Stiltsville on the Biscayne Islands also allowed for moonshining.

When Fidel Castro came to power in Cuba during the Cold War Era, the Biscayne Islands were used by the CIA and the US government to train Cuban dissidents who would later lead a failed invasion of Cuba in the infamous Bay of Pigs fiasco.

In the 1960´s, the area that is now the park was pretty much uninhabited until a massive development project led to the construction of two fossil-fuel power plants and even two nuclear power plants. Despite the ecological importance of this unique ecosystem, the national urge to reduce dependence on foreign oil led to these precarious energy developments.

Fortunately, many organized citizens who appreciated the park for its natural beauty fought against these energy developments. In 1968, the Biscayne National Monument was created while it wasn´t until 1980 that the area became a national park with full protection from industrial and residential development.

The Ecology of Biscayne National Park

The more than 170,000 acres that make up Biscayne National Park are mostly water. However, several small keys Key Biscayne in the north to Key Largo in the south offer pieces of tropical paradise throughout the park. The unique location of Biscayne National Park has allowed for four distinct tropical ecosystems to converge in one place.

Mangrove swamps are one ecosystem that act as a buffer between the keys and the coral reefs. Many small lagoons that are scattered throughout the keys provide another key ecosystem and habitat for a variety of flora and fauna. The island key ecosystem constitutes most of the 9,000 acres of land in the national park, and offshore reef habitats provide some of the best snorkeling and scuba diving found anywhere in the world.

Avid bird watchers often make their way to Biscayne National Park for an opportunity to spot some of the unique tropical birds and migratory birds that can´t be found anywhere else in the continent. Furthermore, Biscayne National Park is home to hundreds of species of marine animals, both mammals, fish, and crustaceans. The giant blue land crab is a rare site that can be spotted throughout the keys.

The Caribbean reef octopus is another unique species that can be found in the water while flamingos, bald eagles, and other varied birds can be found in the air and nesting in the mangrove trees above.

Some Unique Facts and Figures about Biscayne National Park

· 95% of the park is underwater

· Two pirates, both named Black Caesar lived in on the islands of the park in the 18th century

· During Prohibition people came to the keys to drink since alcohol was permitted one mile offshore

· Hurricane Betsy in 1965 ruined Stiltsville, a makeshift community of wealthy Miamians who had built stilt houses on the keys

· In the coral reef, Elkhorn coral dominate up to a depth of 10 meters while staghorn coral make up the majority of the deeper reef ecosystem

· Five species of endangered whales can be occasionally spotted in the offshore waters, including the iconic sperm whale and humpback whale

· The lionfish, endemic to the Indian Ocean, can also curiously be found in the waters of Biscayne National Park

· Burmese pythons, probably illegally released from human captivity, have also been found in the park

· The National Park Services estimates that all of the land of the keys at Biscayne National park will be lost to rising sea levels within the next two centuries

Boating Activities

While there is one terrestrial entrance to the park at Convoy Point, the vast majority of people arrive to Biscayne National Park via boat. Because of the fragile coral reef ecosystem, however, you will need to be careful to follow the buoys. Several fatal boating accidents have occurred due to irresponsible boat driving, and if you do cross into the protected reef ecosystem, you risk a hefty fine from park authorities.

If you don´t have a boat of your own, you can easily sign up for a unique boat tour of the national park at the visitor´s center which will take you through much of the park, introducing you to the four unique ecosystems, the unique flora and fauna, and also the historical structures located throughout the park. The glass bottomed boat tour is something you won´t want to miss. You can also charter a private boat or rent one from the mainland. It is free to enter into the park via boat, though you will need to pay a $20 dollar fee to dock overnight at the harbor at Boca Chita.

Fishing Activities

Most boaters who make their way to the national park come to fish. If you aren´t an experienced fisher, you might want to sign up for a free fishing awareness class offered by the national park service that will teach you what species you can catch and which you need to let be.

Snapper and rock bass are some of the most common species to be caught making for an excellent fish fry at your campsite after a day out on the water. Lobsters, crabs and shrimp can also be found in abundance throughout the park. If you have any luck, you might be in for quite a feast.

Tropical fish and sharks cannot be caught under risk of heavy fine and penalty. While you can fish for the spiny lobster and stone crab (both delicious!), there is a designated lobster sanctuary in the park that you will have to avoid.

If you want to try your hand at a more primitive form of fishing, spear fishing is also allowed in the park and some tour operators might offer unique classes so that you can try your hand at this unique activity. Make sure to sign up for your Florida seawater fishing license before heading out to catch your evening meal.

One of the most important gear for fishing or boating is a quality cooler to keep your catch cold until dinner. For a complete list of the best coolers out there, check out our camping cooler reviews

Kayaking Activities

Another extremely popular activity at Biscayne National Park is kayaking. Especially during holidays and weekends, the amount of motorboats around the park can take away from the enchantment of this tropical paradise. Fortunately, there are several areas around the park that don´t allow motorboats to enter. These restricted areas will allow kayakers and canoes to find their own hidden corners of the park where the only sound you hear will be the gently rolling of waves and the calls of tropical birds in the mangrove swamps.

Simply paddling along the shoreline of the keys will allow you to spot everything from lobsters to crabs to strange looking sponges. If you really want to escape the motorized boats, consider paddling the roughly 7 miles across the bay towards Elliot and Adams Keys. South of Caesar Creek there are several unique lagoons that are closed to motorized boats. Jones Lagoon is perhaps the best place for kayakers where you can find jellyfish and the occasional shark spinning through the waters.

If you didn´t your own kayaks, there are several places to rent. A quick stop by the visitor’s center will allow you to check out all of the different paddling routes that the park offers to people wanting to explore the area without a motor.

Snorkeling and Diving Activities

Perhaps the most appreciated activity offered by Biscayne National Park is snorkeling and scuba diving. To scuba dive in the area, you will have to bring proof of your active scuba license. Snorkeling, however, can be done by anyone.

While you can try and snorkel along the shorelines of the keys, the mangrove forest and the grass and seaweeds can drastically limit what you are able to see and explore. A much better alternative for people wanting to get the true underwater, coral reef experience, is to paddle about 10 miles out to the actual reef where you will find the best snorkeling anywhere in the country. If you don´t feel like you have the stamina to paddle the 10 miles there (and back!), guided tours offered by both the park and private companies out to the reef are also available and you should have a couple of hours built into the trip to spend time exploring the reef with your snorkeling gear.

The Five Best Snorkeling Spots at Biscayne National Park

If you are ready to hit the water and discover the underwater world waiting for you there, you need to know the best places to go snorkeling. Much of the beaches near the keys are populated by thick sea grass which will impede your underwater vision and make for a rather unpleasant snorkeling experience. However, Biscayne National Park offers several fantastic snorkeling spots that allow you to explore everything from shipwrecks to sharks. Below we offer our advice on the top five snorkeling spots around the park.

Maritime Heritage Snorkel Adventure

While some people might think that snorkeling around a shipwreck isn´t as natural or exciting as a “real” coral reef, many ecologists have found that ship wreckage that settles at the bottom of the ocean eventually becomes a part of the natural ecosystem where fish, sharks, corals and other sea creatures make their home.

The Maritime Heritage Snorkel Adventure is a ranger guided snorkeling tour that will allow you to explore the wreckage of the Mandalay shipwreck that went down on 1928. Besides checking out the ship itself, you will also be able to see all sorts of colorful fish, purple sea fans, and other unique aquatic life.

Biscayne Reef

One of the best parts of snorkeling the Biscayne Reef is that the national park service limits the amount of people that are allowed to visit each day. This has allowed for a greater protection of the fragile coral reef ecosystem. Only one private company is allowed to take a maximum of 45 people each day out to the reef, so you will need to make reservations in advance.

Once you get to the reef, however, you will find a virtually untouched reef ecosystem where clownfish, parrot fish, barracudas and even the occasional shark will be your swimming companions.

John Pennekamp Reef

If you forgot to make your reservation for the Biscayne Reef and the tour is booked up for the next couple of days, the nearby John Pennekamp Reef is another great option. Since this reef is just outside the national park, there is less control meaning that there are no limits to the number of people who can visit. You can either private charter a boat to take you to this reef or take your own boat. While the reef itself is less “pristine” than the Biscayne Reef, you will still find a spectacular underwater ecosystem teeming with colorful coral and all sorts of fish.

Elliot Key

While Elliot Key is one of the least visited places in the park, there is also some quality snorkeling spots that can be appreciated. What´s more, you can enjoy hiking throughout Elliot Key and end your day with a snorkeling adventure to cool off. You can find quality reef spots anywhere between and 8 and 20 feet deep just off the coat of Elliot Key

Stiltsville

While the main coral reef is located a good distance away from the keys and the park´s mainland, there are patch reefs located around Stiltsville. If you contract a private boat to take you to visit the old stilt houses from the 1930´s, you might also ask your guide to let you stop and explore the patch reefs that are located nearby.

The Top 9 Fish to Spot While Snorkeling at Biscayne National Park

Unless you´re a marine biologist or a specialist in coral reef ecosystems, chances are that all of the vibrant colored corals, sponges, fish, and other marine life will look like something straight out of a fairy tale. To help you know what to look for and to identify the fish that magically appears from behind a piece of coral, below we offer a brief descriptions of 10 of the most common species of fish that can be spotted at Biscayne National Park.

French Grunt

These peculiar fish are recognized by their bright yellow color with bluish and turquoise lines running across their bodies. What is unique about the French grunt, however, is that if you listen carefully, you might be able to hear them “grunting”; a unique (though somewhat disconcerting) sound that you can hear while snorkeling.

Great Barracuda

This monster fish will most likely scare you if you encounter it during your first snorkeling trip. However, these fish are pretty docile and will most likely leave you alone. Between 2 and 5 feet length, these fish are a spectacular blue gray color and shimmer in the water while they swim.

Glasseye Snapper

This foot long fish is unique because of its pink or reddish coloring. Furthermore, the glasseye snapper is a carnivorous, nocturnal species. You might find it in darker spaces amongst the reef, since during the day it will most likely be resting.

French Angelfish

The French Angelfish is the quintessential coral reef fish. The almost triangular shape of this fish along with its pointed nose, large fins, and elaborate bluish coloring make this an easy one to spot and identify.

Bowfin

These fish are definitely less attractive than some of their other reef companions, but they are a relatively common sight. Large and oblong shaped, these fish can easily reach several feet in length making them substantially larger than other fish you might encounter underwater.

Spotted Dragonet

This is one of the prized fish that snorkelers love to find. The vibrant, beautiful color patterns of the dragonet species make them easily identifiable and a favorite of scuba divers and snorkelers. While these fish are usually found at depths of 45 feet and deeper, they do occasionally rise to surface.

Spotted Sea Trout

Many people think that trout are only fresh water species. However, it is completely possible to find sea trout as well. This species is common in the area and has a beautiful colors along its dorsal fin making it easy to pick out from the pack.

Jack Knife Fish

This unique fish is a frequent visitor to these coral reef and is easily identifiable by its sharp, pointed fin that juts up from its back. The jack knife fish is usually black and white colored though there are other specimens with more vibrant color schemes.

Peacock Flounder

The name alone should make this fish one that you try to spot. The unique turquoise coloring on the peacock flounder makes it a unique, beautiful fish that enlivens the reef ecosystem.

Hiking

Most people don´t come to Biscayne National Park to hike due to the wide array of water activities from boating, fishing, kayaking and snorkeling. However, if you have an extra day or two, there are a few unique trails through some of the keys that will offer you a completely different glimpse into the reality of the region.

A six mile trail running the length of Elliot Key (one of the park´s most unexplored and least visited lands, is a fantastic opportunity to spot some of the unique birds and wildlife that populate the park. There is also a great swimming area that will allow you to cool off after a long day in the sun. For people who are a bit more adventurous, you can also set up camp either in the depth of the forests or along the beach where you will enjoy the clatter of bird song at both dawn and dusk. The stars over the bay aren´t too shabby either.

Visiting Historical Structures

Another good activity you can do either by water or by land is visiting some of the unique historical structures that give testament to the park´s storied history. A private boat tour will take you to the area of what is left of Stiltsville where you´ll be able to imagine a once lively community of wealth millionaires enjoying their own private tropical paradise. While most of Stiltsville´s building were lost to hurricanes, there are a few that are still left standing and in good shape.

Just outside the park, on Key Biscayne, the Cape Florida Lighthouse can also be visited. This lighthouse has been standing continuously since 1825. For a small fee you can climb to the top and enjoy some beautiful views of the surrounding waters. Making it to the top for a sunset view is truly extraordinary.

Lastly, though they aren´t “structures” in the typical sense, Biscayne National Park offers a shipwreck trail where you can visit several of the ships that these rough, coral reef laden waters have claimed over the years. The SS Arratoon Apcar is one shipwreck that is only 10 meters deep. If scuba diving isn´t your thing, you can easily spot the remains of this shop from your boat.

When to Visit Biscayne National Park

Because of the tropical climate at Biscayne National Park, there really isn´t a huge difference in temperature between summer and winter. While the winter months will be slightly cooler, you might want to plan your trip around the rains. The dry season runs from November to April and the temperatures are usually significantly cooler, with an average temperature between 66 and 76 degrees Fahrenheit.

Dry season, then, is usually the best time of year to visit as it will offer you an excuse to escape the colder winters from your hometown. You will also be conveniently missing the hurricane season.

Conclusion

If you are looking for a tropical adventure, great climate, unique wildlife and birds, and one of the most accessible tropical coral reefs in the world, Biscayne National Park is the place for you. Whether you are just escaping from the noise of downtown Miami for a day or two, or coming to spend several weeks exploring the four unique ecosystems, there is plenty to do, see, and explore at Biscayne National Park.

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